Centercenter

This essay Centercenter has a total of 2168 words and 9 pages.




centercenter
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Booker T. Washington Review

Mr.Sowe

11/19/2015

Tremeka Claxton



The Awakening of the Negro
The Awakening of the Negro written by Booker T. Wa shingt on, and was first published in 1899 by The Atlantic Press. Born on April 5, 1856, Booker Taliaferro Washington always had in interest in learning. Whether he had to peak through the windows of the old school house near the plantation where he lived, or when he was reading one of the books his mother had given him, he always had an undying will to learn. In 1872, Washington left home to pursue his need to learn. He walked 500 miles to attend The Hampton Normal Agricultural Institute in Virginia. Along the way he took odd jobs to support himself. After convincing Administration to let him attend the Institute, he began working to pay for his education. Washington graduated from Hampton in 1875, and he began teaching at his old grade school in Malden, Virginia . In 1879, Washington was offered a teaching job teaching at Hampton. In 1881, a colored school, known as the Tuskegee N ormal and Industrial Institute, was built and und er Booker T. Washington's leadership, b ecame a leading school in the country. By the end of his legacy, he had achieved in providing 100 well-equipped buildings, 1,500 students, a 200-member faculty teaching 38 trades and professions, and a nearly $2 million endowment. Washington helped teach Slaves the importance of hard work, and why obtaining financial indepen dence and cultural advancement would eventually help them better themselves in a white society.
In The Awakening of The Negro, Booker T. Washington explains how an education can better someone's financial needs and their community. He explains how he and his colleagues stressed the importance of industrial learning, and how through this former slaves were able to better their financial status and build a better community for themselves and the generations to follow. Washington begins his article went a brief story of his time wondering through the neighborhoods living in poverty. Throughout this story I took note of the fact that every child he visited was doing some sort of learning. Whether it was the little black boy reading a French Grammar book or the little Black girl who was playing an angelic sound on the piano, both of these children were living under poverty but still attempted to learn something. Just as I took note of this Booker T. Washington did as well. He, who grew up with an eagerness to learn, knew of the hardships one had to face in order to get an education during that time, but he also believed that those who wanted one would be better off learning something more. In his article Washington goes on to explain what it was like growing up in poverty. He explains how he received his education and what he did with it. He made it his mission to use what he had learned at the Hampton Institute as a means to teach his fellow African Americans what is truly needed to live in a white society.
During his time as the leader of the Tuskegee Institute, he taught students how to work, how to build, and gives them a chance to gain knowledge while doing labor. With the help of his colleagues and students Washington goes to the Black Belt of the South and begins teaching others how to live. With his help former slaves began learning how to sacrifice and cut back. They no longer lived from hand to hand but learned how to live off bread and potatoes. He helped teach them how to farm better and how they could get out of debt, so that in the near future they could buy and own their own lands. The idea of Industrial knowledge somewhat scared the former slaves, who had already worked as labors all their lives. However the idea of this industrial learning not only gave the Negros knowledge on better living, but also taught them the importance of labor. No longer would they be the dependent factor in the world , but now the White man would have to depend on their services

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