Beauty

Canterbury Tales - In and Out Sit and Spin: Chaucer?s social commentary grows from so-called intrusion The relationship Geoffrey Chaucer establishes between outsiders and insiders in The Canterbury Tales provides the primary fuel for the poetry?s social commentary. Both tales and moments within tales describing instances of intrusion work to create a sense of proper order disturbed in the imaginary, structured universes presented by the pilgrims. The perturbances, conflicts born of these example
Canterbury Tales In Chaucer?s day women were thought of in lesser regard than men. Their positions in the community were less noble and often displeasing. The Canterbury Tales, written by Chaucer, is about a pilgrimage to Canterbury. Along with the narrator (Chaucer), there are 29 other Canterbury pilgrims. Not surprisingly, only three of them are women: the Prioress, the associate of the Prioress, and the Wife of Bath. Each traveler is to tell two tales to make the journey to Canterbury and bac
Babylon Revisited Can?t Buy Me Love The depression was an era of extremes. A person was more than likely extremely poor, or in the lucky upper 1% that was extremely wealthy. The middle class was virtually not existent. All of these income groups, including those characterized in our three stories, wanted money because it supposedly brought happiness, but were actually struggling to cling to the intangible, unreachable feeling of love. If money leads to love, Dexter Green has bought it a thousand
Candide Candide Wealth and great materialistic possession brings happiness and success to most people?s lives. Although wealth does not always bring happiness, El Dorado was one society where all it?s inhabitants lived lives full of success and happiness. In Candide, wealth proved to guarantee a person a step forward in life and some sense of freedom. Sometimes when one lives in an environment consisting of total equality, one may prefer to leave and go to a different place where they would be c
Little Girl Lost A Little GIRL Lost from Songs of Experience is one of Blake?s most important poems. Though judging the aesthetic value of a poem is nearly impossible, I would contend that A Little Girl Lost is better than The Little Girl Lost found in Songs of Innocence. Perhaps because A Little Girl Lost was composed as an afterthought to its original counterpart, having been first written in Innocence, it acts as a conclusion to the original poem. The two poems both observe a young girl as sh
The Yellow Wallpaper Bibliographic Essay on "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman Ruth Carol Berkin's "Self-Images: Childhood and Adolescence" discusses how the effect of major symbolic elements of women in literature are often portrayed in a position that is dominated by men, especially in the nineteenth century, women were repressed and controlled by their husbands as well as other male influences. In "The Yellow Wall-Paper," by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Berkin believes the narrat
Rime of the ancient Mariner Biblical Symbolism in Rime of the Ancient Mariner Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," written in 1797, has been widely discussed throughout literary history. Although critics have come up with many different interpretations of this poem, one idea that has remained prevalent throughout these discussions is the apparent religious symbolism present throughout this poem. "The Ancient Mariner" contains natural, gothic, and biblical symbolism;
Beautiful Blueberries (About Into the Wild) Beautiful Blueberries Christopher McCandless' last journal entry before dying of starvation in the Alaska bush was simply the words "Beautiful Blueberries". Over the previous two years he bought a secondhand canoe on impulse and paddled to Mexico. Then he lived on the streets of Los Angeles with vagrants, camped in the Arizona dessert with hippies, tramped through almost every western state, occasionally holding odd jobs. He also lived completely off t
Balthazar Balthazar??s Marvelous Afternoon ( Why didn??t Balthazar receive the money?) ?? Balthazar??s Marvelous Afternoon ??, written by Gabrial Garcia Marquez, is a story about a birdcage and a poor carpenter, Balthazar. In the story, Balthazar made a beautiful birdcage that was commissioned by Pepe, the son of a rich man, Jose Montiel. However, when the carpenter took it to the boy, his father refused to pay and rather said to sell it other people. Although Balthazar got really angry, he gave
Bad Luck in Love! She moved into the house across the street when I was fifteen. She was fourteen. I was dumb struck. I had never seen a girl like Lilly before, and probably never will again. I had to have her. I fell in love from the first moment I saw her. My father returned from work at his usual time of 5:30 in the afternoon.I ran out to tell him we had new neighbors. He told me he already knew that. He said he had met Mr. Smith on Saturday when I was camping out. He asked if I had met the d
Awakening vs. Greenleaf A strong critique by existentialist writers of modern society is the way in which humans live unexamined, meaningless lives with no true concept of what it is to be an unique individuals. In Kate Chopin?s novel The Awakening and in Flannery O?Connor?s short story Greenleaf the characters Edna and Mrs. May, respectively, begin almost as common, stock characters living unfulfilled lives. They eventually converge, however, upon an elevated life and death filled with new mean
Antony And Cleopatra Antony and Cleopatra In Shakespeare's tragedy/history/Roman play Antony and Cleopatra, we are told the story of two passionate and power-hungry lovers. In the first two Acts of the play we are introduced to some of the problems and dilemmas facing the couple (such as the fact that they are entwined in an adulterous relationship, and that both of them are forced to show their devotion to Caesar). Along with being introduced to Antony and Cleopatra's strange love affair, we ar
Anderson I Want to know Why Anderson: "I Want to know Why" People become human through common experiences. The thread running through this essay clearly demonstrates the power that a shared love for horses and racing overcomes racial boundaries. The introductory paragraph with its masterly structure accounts for the story's gripping power. The narrator brings us vividly into the story as "we got up at four in the morning, that first day in the east". He and his friends "with the true instinct of
Ancient Mariner "Look out Below!" - Craaack! About 15 Men and women turn their glances toward the sky, and see a large, perhaps 100 feet, tree falling to the ground. As the tree hits the solid earth, everything grows very quiet. All look at the lumberjack, who killed this tree, and find him weeping in sorrow. This situation is not uncommon when dealing with Nature. Nature, as simple as it seems to some, generates great power. This power is sent to us, as nature forgives only after a physical, em
to an athlete dying young To An Athlete Dying Young The time you won your town the race We chaired you through the market-place; Man and boy stood cheering by, And home we brought you shoulder-high. To-day, the road all runners come, Shoulder-high we bring you home, And set you at your threshold down, Townsman of a stiller town. Smart lad, to slip betimes away From fields where glory does not stay And early though the laurel grows It withers quicker than the rose. Eyes the shady night has shut C
The Illiad - Analysis of Similies Analysis of Similes in the Illiad In the Iliad, Homer finds a great tool in the simile. Just by opening the book in a random place the reader is undoubtedly faced with one, or within a few pages. Homer seems to use everyday activities, at least for the audience, his fellow Greeks, in these similes nearly exclusively. When one is confronted with a situation that is familiar, one is more likely to put aside contemplating the topic and simply inject those known fee
Nature in the Works An Analysis of Nature in the works of Robert Frost When reading poetry by Robert Frost the theme of nature is strongly present and persistent. Robert Frost uses the world around him to create a mystic feeling to his writings, almost giving the reader a sense of nostalgia. The influence of nature in Frost?s works creates a palette to paint a picture filled with symbolism for the reader to interpret. The nature in the poems makes the poem an intimate piece in which most readers
American Beauty American Beauty You can never be too thin or too rich, said the Duchess of Windsor. She might have added "or too pretty." What psychologists call the "attractiveness stereotype" is so strong that beauty is literally equated with goodness. Good-looking people are not only preferred for dates, friendships and jobs, they're believed to have more intelligence and integrity. It goes without saying that the beauty bias is even more powerful and universal for women. Beautiful women are
Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn: The chosen task is number 6- a book reviewed by a newspaper (my own doing). A unique cooperation between the New- York Times, the most influential newspaper in the world, Mark Twain, one of the most popular novelists ever lived: Mark Twain?s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel about a young boy?s coming of age in the Missouri of the mid-1800s. It is the story of Huck?s struggle to win freedom for himself and Jim, a Negro slave.
A Streetcar Named Desire A Streetcar Named Desire: Analysis of Blanche Dubois Blanche Dubious, appropriately dressed in white, is first introduced as a symbol of innocence and chastity. Aristocratic, refined, and sensitive, this delicate beauty has a moth-like appearance. She has come to New Orleans to seek refuge at the home of her sister Stella and her coarse Polish husband, Stanley. With her nervous and refined nature, Blanche is a clear misfit in the Kowalski's apartment. Blanche represents
The Bluest Eyes - A search for identity A Search For A Self Finding a self-identity is often a sign of maturing and growing up. This becomes the main issue in Toni Morrison?s novel The Bluest Eyes. Pecola Breedlove, Cholly Breedlove, and Pauline Breedlove are such characters that search for their identity through others that has influenced them and by the lifestyles that they have. First, Pecola Breedlove struggles to get accepted into society due to the beauty factor that the norm has. Cholly B
A Rose for Emily Miss Emily?s House: A Symbol of Neglect Miss Emily?s House: A Symbol of Neglect A Rose for Emily, is the remarkable story of Emily Grierson, whose death and funeral drew the attention of the town. The bizarre outcome is further emphasized throughout by the symbolism of the decaying house, which parallels Miss Emily?s physical deterioration and demonstrates her ultimate mental disintegration. Emily?s life, like the house which decays around her, suffers from lack of genuine love
The Odyssey - Manhood A Reminder of Manhood Throughout Homer's epic work, The Odyssey, Odysseus encounters temptations of beautiful women and the promise of immortality. Under the price of having to sacrifice his manhood, Odysseus is willing to abandon his homeland, one of the ways in which manhood was defined in the ancient world, to live in eternal bliss. Calypso, Circe, and the Sirens are all examples of the beautiful women whom Odysseus must face and overcome in order to return to his native
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Religion as Repression A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: Religion as Repression Like his protagonist, James Joyce was an Irish Catholic. He was also sent to Clongowes Wood College to board and study as a young boy. In effect the story is in part an autobiography of Joyce's own life up to the age of twenty or so (Kershner 6). In his essay A Portrait as Rebellion Norman Holland states: Because of Portrait's peculiar combination of novel and autobiogra
A New England Nun In A New England Nun , Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife. This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets? lives, her dog Caesar?s and that of her little yellow ca
A Good Man Is Hard to Find The short story "A Good Man is Hard to Find" by Flannery O'Connor could be viewed as a comic strip about massacre and martyrdom. What stops it from becoming a solemn story is its intensity, ambition, and unfamiliarity. O'Connor blends the line between humor and terror. She introduces her audience to the horror of self-love. The grandmother is thought of by the community as agood person and appears to be so on the surface, but she is also mean and narcissistic. She forc
A Good Man Is Hard to Find A Good Man is Hard to Find In the short story, A Good Man is Hard to Find , the main character is the grandmother. Flannery O?Connor, the author, lets the reader find out who the grandmother is by her conversations and reactions to the other characters in the story. The grandmother is the most important character in the story because she has a main role in the stories principal action. This little old lady is the protagonist in this piece. We learn more about her from
A description of winter Magic Falling There are the days that are dreary and overcast. The mood is sullen and dark, and the family is bored. The cold reaches to the bone and chills throughout the body. The tree branches are stark bare, their leaves stripped off in the fall; their beauty gone. Dirt covers the wet snow that lays uneven over the yard, or piled on the side of the driveway. Yet, there are the days of magic, when fresh, fluffy snow bursts through the clouds and surrounds everything. T
Skin Care Throughout the late 1800's and until the present, cosmetics and skin care have been important in the lives of women in America. Certain trends have come and gone, just as some have remained. In the past 100 years, the roles and lives of women have changed drastically, but their cosmetics have always been around. Charm books along with step-by-step manuals give us today a look into the past. Advertisements are also a great source of history. Using these means, central themes in cosmetic
Young Goodman Brown I began my Hawthorne reading task with The Birth-Mark. I picked this story because I am familiar with the Maypole of Merrymount and Young Goodman Brown, and I wanted to try something different. I was pleasantly surprised with The Birth-Mark, in my mind it far surpasses the latter two stories. I think one of the most admirable traits of Hawthorne is his ability to write as though actions are taking place somewhere in the present. Aylmer could very well live today, somewhere in
Wuthering Heights - Catherine and Heathcliff A Presentation of the Personalities of Heathcliff and Murray Kempton once admitted, ?No great scoundrel is ever uninteresting.? The human race continually focuses on characters who intentionally harm others and create damaging situations for their own benefit. Despite popular morals, characters who display an utter disregard for the natural order of human life are characters who are often deemed iconic and are thoroughly scrutinized. If only the chara
With Malice Toward None About the Author Stephen B. Oates is a professor of history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and the author of eight other books, including The Fires of Jubilee and To Purge This Land with Blood. His task in this biography was to perpetuate Lincoln as he was in the days he lived. His purpose of this biography was to bring the past into the present for us and his students. The Life of Abraham Lincoln Although other states such as Indiana lay claim to his birth,
Winter Oak - Yuri Nagibin 1.a) Our gut reaction to Winter Oak is that it had a lot of meaning, but was dull and tedious. Some words and phrases we used to relate our thoughts on the story are as follows: - Boring. - Monotonous. - No real conflict. - No feeling. - No real plot. - Didn?t invoke a strong reaction. - There was a definite lesson to be learned. 1.b) Yuri Nagibin used different devices to evoke various reactions in us, some of these were: The dialogue; it was concise yet boring but rea
White Fang White Fang by Jack London, was written in 1906. The story is about a half-wolf, half-dog who is born from a she-wolf. His name is White Fang he is the only survivor of the litter. He becomes a pet of some Indians and becomes a great fighter. A man named Beauty Smith buys White Fang for liquor. Beauty uses White Fang to make money. He arranges fights to let people bet on, White Fang wins them all. Except A pitbull who bites White Fang in the neck and grips on. Finally a man named Weedo
Uncle Tom's Cabin Harriet Beecher Stowe was born June 14, 1811 in Litchfield, Connecticut. She was the daughter of a Calvinist minister and she and her family was all devout Christians, her father being a preacher and her siblings following. Her Christian attitude much reflected her attitude towards slavery. She was for abolishing it, because it was, to her, a very unchristian and cruel institution. Her novel, therefore, focused on the ghastly points of slavery, including the whippings, beatings
Tragically Inane: The Cherry Orchard and Six Characters The deconstruction of the conventions of the theatre in Anton Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard predicts the more radical obliteration presented later by Pirandello in Six Characters in Search of an Author. The seed of this attack on convention by Chekhov are the inherent flaws of all the characters in The Cherry Orchard. The lack of any character with which to identify or understand creates a portrait much closer to reality than the staged dram
To His Coy Mistress: Beneath the Romance Few would argue that on the surface level of Marvel's "To His Coy Mistress" the speaker is a lover advancing a conventional 'carpe diem' line of thought. He systematically reasons with his desired object about the futility of delaying their interlude when the hours available to them are limited, but the lyric may simultaneously function as a metaphor for Marvel's endeavors as a metaphysical poet. Metaphysical writers view poetry as an intellectual exercis
Their Eyes Were Watching God Janie's entire life is one of a journey. She lives through a grandmother, three husbands, and innumerable friends. Throughout is all, she grows closer and closer to her ideals about love and how to live one's life. Zora Neale Hurston chooses to define Janie not by what is wrong in her life, but by what is good in it. Janie changes a lot from the beginning to the end of Their Eyes Were Watching God, but the imagery in her life always conjures positive ideas in the min
Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God" Research Paper "I am Me, My Eyes Toward God" Mark Evans Zora Neale Hurston an early twentieth century Afro-American feminist author, was raised in a predominately black community which gave her an unique perspective on race relations, evident in her novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God. Hurston drew on her on experiences as a feminist Afro-American female to create a story about the magical transformation of Janie, f
The Vision Most people are skeptical about psychics and psychic powers. In the book The Vision by Dean Koontz, there arises a real convincing psychic Mary, who has visions of murders that are yet to happen. But, a new twist to the story causes Mary to see a different kind of vision. Murders more gruesome than ever. More difficult to see. Harder to pursue. All these factors cause the reader, and possibly Mary to wonder who are the ones who really care for her. Can the murderer possibly be someone
The Picture of Dorian Gray: Corruption Through Aestheticism The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde is the story of moral corruption by the means of aestheticism. In the novel, the well meaning artist Basil Hallward presets young Dorian Gray with a portrait of himself. After conversing with cynical Lord Henry Wotton, Dorian makes a wish which dreadfully affects his life forever. "If it were I who was to be always young, and the picture that was to grow old! For that I would give everything! Ye
The Iliad Similes in the Iliad and What They Tell Us About Life in Homer's Greece "The Iliad", an epic tale told by the famous Greek author Homer, is focused primarily on the Trojan War between the Greeks, or Argives, and the Trojans. This war was filled with bloody battles and a massive loss of life. Homer tells stories about a duration of time during this fighting, and not the entire war. He uses his story-telling abilities to focus the audience on the garish and sometimes mundane drudgery of
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame The Hunchback of Notre-Dame In this novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831), Victor Hugo talks about the life of his characters in the city of Paris. This story takes place in the late-fourteenth century. With inequality all around it was hard for a person to gain respect without good looks or social status. In this paper I will mainly discuss the story of Quasimodoe Esmeralda, and their struggle in this story Quasimodoe's mother was a gypsy. She could not take care
The Good Earth The Good Earth, by Pearl S. Buck, is a tale of a farmer who rises from a commoner to a wealthy land owner. The setting is pre-Revolutionary China, sometime in the 20th century. The story is one of a farmer who becomes a wealthy man through hard work while facing droughts and floods. He becomes very rich, but forgets his true love, the earth, which got him to where he was. The mood of the story is serious. Droughts and floods affect the outcome of crops, which in turn, affect the p
The Good Earth In The Good Earth, by Pearl S, Wang Lung the main character is a poor peasant who buys a wife and moves up in the social ladder during the peasants' revolution. This story displays many major ideas of ancient Chinese culture, such as the social order, the treatment of women, and the role of the family in everyday life. At the beginning of the movie the following quote appears on the screen "The soul of a great nation is expressed in the life of its humblest people. In this simple
Beauty and the Beast Analysis of Beauty and The Beast If you ask any American child if they have heard of the story of Beauty and The Beast, ninety-nine percent of them will have very good memory of the tale. Beauty and The Beast has been a part of our culture for many years as are many fairytales. It is read or told to our children not just for entertainment but for the moral lessons it gives to us. What most people don't realize is that there is more to this story than just it's moral values.
The Bluest Eye The Bluest Eye is a brilliantly written novel revealing the fictional trauma of an eleven-year-old black girl named Pecola Breedlove. This story takes place in the town of Lorain, Ohio during the 1940?s. It is told from the perspective of a young girl named Claudia MacTeer. She and her sister, Frieda, become witness to the terrible plights Pecola is unintentionally put through. Pecola chooses to hide from her disabling life behind her clouded dream of possessing the ever so cheris
The House of the Seven Gables American literature reflects life and the struggles faced during existence. Symbols are an eloquent way for an author to create a more fully developed work of art. The stories themselves tell a tale; however, an author also uses symbols to relay his message in a more subtle manner. Nathaniel Hawthorne was one of the earliest authors to use symbols as an integral part of his plots. This is clearly seen in both The Scarlet Letter and in The House of the Seven Gables.
Pride and Prejudice: 5 Married Couples Jane Austen?s novel, Pride and Prejudice presents five married couples. No two are alike. From the pure love which was experienced through Elizabeth and Darcy. To the love and attraction shared by Jane and Bingley. The convenience of marriage was portrayed through Charlotte and Mr Collins while Lydia and Wickham?s marriage was based on their desire, attractions and financial status. Mr and Mrs Bennet?s marriage was for their necessity. Austen reveals many m
Oedipus Rex: classic tragic hero In the play Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, Oedipus is a classic tragic hero. According to Aristotle's definition, Oedipus is a tragic hero because he is a king whose life falls apart when he finds out his life story. There are a number of characteristics described by Aristotle that identify a tragic hero. For example, a tragic hero must cause his own downfall; his fate is not deserved, and his punishment exceeds the crime; he also must be of noble stature and have gre