Death Penalty

Death Penalty

For many years the United States has been battling the issues of the death penalty. Many people are divided, not just our legislators, but citizens, religious groups, victims of violence, and families that have been affected from a loved one put on death row. There are many arguments for people against and for the death penalty. Some people say that the death penalty mainly targets minorities and that the juries in many of these trials are mostly white people, sentencing the offender. When there is a white victim, some statistics show that the offender is more likely to receive the death penalty. With the advancement in technology and improved DNA testing, many people on death row have been exonerated from the crimes completely.
Opponents of the death penalty make quite a few claims, all of which could be valid points. Some of the claims include; it doesnít deter crime, execution of innocent people, every human life is sacred, the state would be lowering morals to that of a murderer, it doesnít have a set standard nationally, targets minorities, goes against most religious beliefs, inhumane and barbaric, life imprisonment is a better alternative. The biggest reason that I would be against the death penalty, would be the execution of an innocent person. Opponents of capital punishment say it has no deterrent effect on crime, wrongly gives governments the power to take human life, and continues social discriminations by targeting minorities and people who cannot afford good attorneys. . A common argument against the death penalty is the large percentage of minorities that are put to death by the state, and this has led to many accusations of existing racism. They say lifetime jail sentences are a more severe and less expensive punishment than death.
Advocates for the death penalty donít want to waste tax dollars on lifetime incarceration. We need to change our system so that defendants are properly represented, and if the evidence clearly proves the defendant guilty. They should be put to death immediately after the sentence is imposed. The victim/ or victims of the crime werenít able to extend their life, the defendant didnít have a care in the world about his victim or family members. The death penalty also helps reduce the population problems in our prisons. Too many murderers are just sitting in a prison cell, appealing their sentence. We need due process to protect victims as well. Punishment of this kind would be a deterrent for future crimes committed. Peace of mind can be brought to those families affected by these criminals, with the safety of knowing that these people have no possibility of hurting again. With new technology and DNA testing we can be sure that the true criminal will be put to death. Advocates of the death penalty say it is an important tool for preserving law and order, deters crime, and costs less than life imprisonment. They argue that justice ďan eye for an eye" is what the victim deserves, and helps comfort grieving families, and ensures that the offenders of these horrible crimes never have an opportunity to hurt again. The death penalty provides a very important element to the families of the murdered; closure to the victimsí families is the most important reason why I support of the death penalty. A fair system of justice, is one of the key features of the United States as a nation. Victims of crimes look to the government to have people brought to justice. Our country has often seen the death penalty as a form of justice to the family. The wide spread availability of DNA testing in cases involving capital punishment has allowed for a massive decreased risk of an innocent man being convicted. Before the availability of this technology, there was a much greater chance of an innocent person being sentenced to death. Additionally, the death penalty serves as a crime deterrent, the possibility of being put to death stops many who would otherwise commit crimes from going through with these acts. Of all possible punishments, none are feared more than death. Those convicted of violent crimes clearly prefer life in prison to execution, if not; they would not attempt to be sentenced to life in prison