Haaga, John G. “Educational Attainment in Appalachia,” Demographic and Socioeconomic
Change in Appalachia, Washington, DC: Population Reference Bureau and Appalachian
Regional Commission, (2004): 2-24
This article talks about how education makes a difference in trying to break the cycle of poverty. Poor rural areas have a low quality of schooling and the expectations aren’t as high as they are for middle-class kids. Even within Appalachia the independent schools that are a part of the county seat are much higher quality -- almost more like suburban schools or even private schools than the larger, rougher disorganized county schools where the country kids go. Kids who can have predictability in the family income and where families live and what\'s going on in the family are more successful at navigating adolescence.
Mannion, Elgin, and Dwight B. Billings. "Poverty and Income Inequality in Appalachia."
Population Change and Rural Society The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and
Population Analysis (2006): 357-79
This article also talks about how education makes a difference in trying to break the cycle of poverty. In Appalachia adults are uneducated, the institutions are poor and inadequate to make up for what families do not offer to young people and everyday life is just plain hard. There must be a greater commitment to investment in education and skills and it requires a significant economic engine to create the kind of jobs that support the population.