Hiroshima


Hiroshima

Chapter 1 ? A Noiseless Flash
The story starts out by a mini intro of the characters. Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the East Asia Tin Works, was sitting down talking to the girl of the next desk. Dr. Fuji was sitting down the Osaka Asahi on the porch of his private hospital. Mrs. Hatsuyo Nakamura, a tailor?s widow, stood by the window of her kitchen, watching a neighbor tear down his house. Father Wilhelm Kleinsorge, a German priest, reclined in his underwear on a cot on the top floor of his order?s mission house. Dr. Terufumi Sasaki, a young member of the surgical staff of the city?s Red Cross Hospital, walked along in the halls carrying a blood specimen. Reverend Mr. Kiyoshi Tanimoto, a pastor of the Hiroshima Methodist was carrying some of his possessions to a rich man?s house in fear of the massive B-29 raid, which everyone expected Hiroshima to suffer.

Reverend Mr. Tanimoto
Mr. Tanimoto was a small man, quick to talk, laugh, and cry. His hair parted in the middle and rather long; the prominence of the frontal bones just above his eyebrows and the smallness of hi mustache, mouth, and chin gave him a strange, old-young look, boyish and yet wise, weak and yet fiery. He woke up a 5:00 because he could not sleep. He was worrying about his wife and kids, and a massive raid on their town. Mr. Tanimoto had studied theology at Emory College, in Atlanta, Georgia. He started to carry his things and belongings from the church with his friend Mr. Matsuo to Mr. Matsui?s house, a man who let a large number of his friends and acquaintances, so that they might evacuate whatever they wished to a safe distance from the target area. Mr. Tanimoto and Mr. Matsuo made a quick stop to Mr. Matsuo?s house to carry a large Japanese cabinet. They arrived to Mr. Matsui?s house tired and exhausted. A tremendous flash of light cut across the sky. They were 2 miles from the center of the explosion. Mr. Matsuo dived in the bedrolls. Mr. Tanimoto took four or five steps into the house and threw himself between two big rocks in the garden. There was no roar. When Mr. Tanimoto looked up, he saw Mr. Matsui?s house was in to pieces. Mr. Tanimoto dashed out to the streets and noticed everything around him was in ruins too.

Mrs. Hatsuyo Nakamura
Mrs. Hatsuyo Nakamura, a tailor?s widow, lived in the section called Nobori-cho. She set her three children- a 10-year-old boy (Toshio), an 8-year-old girl (Yaeko), and a 5-year-old girl (Myeko) to sleep. They woke up at two, when they heard the big roar of the planes going over Hiroshima. They reached home after about 30 minutes later (2:30). She turned on the radio, to her dismay, broadcasted a fresh warning. She did not want to move anymore (she has been for a very long time). So she set her children to sleep. She started to cook some rice and watched a neighbor tear down his house. Suddenly, everything flashed whiter than any white had ever seen. Mrs. Nakamura was about ? miles away from the center of the explosion. She seemed to fly into the next room over the raised sleeping platform, pursued by parts of her house. Her youngest daughter was buried and unable to move. Mrs. Nakamura frantically tried to claw her daughter out, not knowing of her other children.

Dr. Masakazu Fujii
Dr. Fujii was the proprietor of a peculiarly Japanese institution: a private, single doctor hospital. His hospital was next to the Kyo River, and next to the bridge at the same name, contained 30 rooms for the patients and their kinfolk. Dr. Fujii had only straw mats for his patients and not beds. He did have some modern equipment- an X-ray machine, diathermy apparatus, and a fine tiled laboratory. The structure rested 2/3 on the land, one-third on piles over the tidal waters of the Kyo. He now only had two patients, women from Yano, injured in the shoulder, and a young man of 25 recovering from burns from the steel factory. Dr. Fujii had six nurses to tend his patients. His wife and children were safe; his wife and one son were living outside Osaka, another son and two daughters were in the country on Kyushu. A niece