Lesson 1: Close text reading (For gist)Curriculum content: English Language Arts: Reading Informational TextDOK Level 3

CCLS:

Key ideas and details
 
R.I. 6.1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.
R.I.6.2: Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details;
provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
R.I. 6.3: Analyze in detail how key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and
elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).
R.I. 6.6: Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is
conveyed in the text.
RI.6.10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6–8
text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
 

For or Against: Kids on reality TV!



Introduction to task:
Accessing prior knowledge: Before first read of essay teacher will ask student , “Do you watch reality TV? Which ones?”
After a brief discussion the teacher will explain that there is a debate about whether or not reality TV is harmful to the children appearing on them. Teacher announces to students that they will be reading an essay titled “Should kids be on reality TV”? and writing an argument essay in which they will take a position using facts from the text.
Before beginning a reading aloud of the essay, the teacher reminds students that the purpose of this first reading is to get the “gist” of the essay as they follow on their copy, with a focus on key ideas and details.
As a guide the teacher writes three questions prompts on the smartboard for the students to keep in mind. “What did you read”? “What did you learn?” “What questions do you have?”
 

Preceding and Subsequent goals of instruction surrounding the lesson:
Prompts and in current lessons have prepped students for the task and expectations. They will be writing an argumentative essay expressing their point of view and another point of view and will need to cite information from the text as support for both. Subsequent lessons will scaffold close text reading, reading analysis, key vocabulary, and the writing process that will be needed to support a point of view and write an argumentative essay.

Resources:
Essay titled “Should kids be on Reality TV?”? Reader’s response journal; question prompts on transparency or Smart board: What did you read? What did you learn? What questions do you have?
 



Instructional Delivery
Teacher involvement:
Teacher will display question prompts on smartboard that will be focus of lesson one: What did we read? What did we learn? What questions do we have?
The teacher will read through the entire essay as students listen.
Teacher will then ask students to turn and talk guided by the questions prompts introduced at the beginning of the lesson.
Students will then be asked to write responses to the question prompts in their journals. Teacher will asked students to turn and talk.
 
Teaching strategies:
For multiple learning entry points the teacher will employ verbal and written representations of the essay; students will express themselves to each other and teacher to student and through note-taking, and engagement will be facilitated by connecting topic to prior knowledge .
Direct teacher to student instruction; individual and cooperative learning strategies.

Procedure of each session: (UDL elements)
Engagement: Question hook:(Do you watch reality TV? What shows?.
Representation: Smart board/transparency with question prompts; verbal read aloud.
Expression: turn&talk; individual notetaking in journal, shareout.

Procedure for transitions:
Teacher will post question prompts and direct students to keep them in mind during first read of essay. Teacher will conduct first read for “gist” as students listen and follow on their copies. Students asked to t&t guided by question prompts. Then write responses in journal. Students shareout.







Lesson 2: Close text reading (Vocabulary)Curriculum content: English Language Arts: Reading Informational TextDOK Level 3

CCLS:

Key ideas and details
 
R.I. 6.1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.
R.I.6.2: Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details;
provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
R.I. 6.3: