Symbolism in Theater and Cinema
Jennifer Linnell
ARTS 100
December 14, 2015
Shay Tyler

Symbolism in Theater and Cinema
It can be said that the shark symbolizes any inconvenience that society may deal with by instead of staying out of the territory of the shark which would prevent any additional deaths, the shark is hunted down and killed. When our society is unable to deal with something that can be seen as an inconvenience to the way that we want to live, something is done to remove that inconvenience http://123student.com/content/a123/pending/306.docxusually to a point where it is destroyed rather than worked into the pattern of our lives. Things happening in today\'s society is a perfect example of this. This could symbolize the way that we treat the environment in a whole in that humankind seems to be more interested in getting cheap power or polluting our oceans.
The genre that I feel is appropriate for bringing Jaws to Broadway would be a melodrama. There are the external forces, mostly the Mayor and town business owners that prevent Chief Brody from doing what should be done to protect the citizens and visitors of Amity Island.
Music would be an important part of the play as it was essential to the movie. Everyone associates "Jaws" with the "Dun dun, dun dun", building up to the attack. The way that music is used in the film made the audience connect emotionally, pulling them to the edge of their seats, even in scenes where nothing dangerous occurs, but could have happened (Brown, 1997, p. 45). Another element of production to be used would be lighting. Lighting will help to set the mood, but will not be able to be too dark, or the audience will be unable to see what is going on. Dimming the lights on the stage while pinpointing lights on something specific will be the right way to approach these types of dramatic scenes, such as when they cut open the tiger shark to determine if it was the shark killing people. The final element of production to be used would be the scenery. There would need to be several scenes shown, and the beach scenes may be the hardest to stage as it would need to be delineated between the ocean and the sand of the beach. The best approach would be to have a thrust stage that may possibly allow for more stage depth.
































References
Brown, J. R. (1997). What is theatre?: an introduction and exploration. Boston: Focal Press.