Valerie Vladianu
30 June 2015
English 1020
WW1
Tainted love
Rose- purity
Sick – infected
Invisible worm – destroys what is good, infects, taints – without our knowledge at first
Howling storm – our daily life is a battle; keeping love peaceful and pure is a challenge. Your thoughts can be a challenge, whistling in your ears
In the night – when we are supposed to be quiet and peacefully at rest in our bed
Crimson joy – stained joy, uncleanness, pollution
Dark secret love – other motives
Destroys life - secrets destroy relationships and love

All roses are created beautifully but outside the malevolent “invisible worm” destroys what is good. It infects and it taints without a rose’s knowledge at first. William Blake’s poem “The Sick Rose” shows how love and purity can easily be tainted by destructive thoughts.
The author continues to show that “in the night […] the howling storm” whistles in our ears. That storm is the battle we face in daily life because it is a challenge to keep love peaceful and pure. Our thoughts are the ones we fight and they can be like a storm shrieking in our ears. In the night, when we are supposed to be quiet and peacefully resting in our beds, our thoughts keep us awake.
Love and purity are something joyous but joy can be ‘crimson’ when it is stained and unclean. The rose is now polluted by the worm, who in turn has ‘dark secret love’ which end up being ulterior motives. The worm doesn’t want joyful, pure love but has a hidden thoughts. These secret thoughts ultimately destroy relationships and love.
The rose does not realize at first the hurtful thoughts with which the worm infects it. Yet by the end it gets sicker and sicker and grasps the destruction. The rose possibly dies in the end because it is too late to cure the infection.