Leonardo Fibonacci was an Italian mathematician, considered by some, as the most talented mathematician of the middle ages. Leonardo Fibonacci was born in Pisa, Italy, around 1175. His father was Guillermo Bonacci, a secretary of the Republic of Pisa. His father was also a customs officer for the North African city of Bugia. Sometime after 1192. Bonacci brought his son with him to Bugia.Guilielmo wanted for Leonardo to become a merchant and so arranged for his instruction in calculation techniques, especially those involving the Hindu - Arabic numerals which had not yet been introduced into Europe. Since Fibonacci was the son of a merchant, he was able go travel freely all over the Byzantine Empire. Merchants at the time were immune, so they were allowed to move about freely. This allowed him to visit many of the area's centers of trade. While he was there, he was able to learn both the mathematics of the scholars and the calculating schemes in popular use, at the time.

Around 1200, Fibonacci returned to Pisa. Leonardo Fibonacci was the greatest European mathematician of the Middle Ages. He was the first to introduce the Hindu - Arabic number system into Europe. Leonardo wrote a book on how to do arithmetic in the decimal system, called "Liber abaci", completed in 1202. It describes the rules we are all now learn at elementary school for adding numbers, subtracting, multiplying and dividing. In his book Leonardo wrote the numerals in descending order and his fractions came before the numeral like 1/2 4 instead of 4 1/2.

One result of his book attested to his mastery not only of the Hindy-Arabic techniques of practical calculation but also of the theory of quadratic equations. In his work, Fibonacci put forth not so much an original exposition as a compilation of the techniques of Arabic arithmetic and algebra. Leonardo`s mathematical environment encompassed more than this Arabic theory of algebra however. Within his sphere of commercial activities, there also a need for comprehensive catalogues of techniques for solving day-to-day problems.

Fibonacci ended his travels around the year 1200 and at that time he returned to Pisa. There he wrote a number of important texts which played an important role in reviving ancient mathematical skills and he made significant contributions of his own. Fibonacci lived in the days before printing, so his books were hand written and the only way to have a copy of one of his books was to have another hand-written copy made. Of his books we still have copies of Liber abaci (1202), Practica geometriae (1220), Flos (1225), and Liber quadratorum. We know that he wrote some other texts which, unfortunately, are lost.

Fibonacci's influence was more limited than one might have hoped and apart from his role in spreading the use of the Hindu-Arabic numerals and his rabbit problem, Fibonacci's contribution to mathematics has been largely overlooked. Direct influence was exerted only by those portions of the Liber abaci and of the Practica that served to introduce Hindu-Arabic numerals and methods and contributed to the mastering of the problems of daily life. Here Fibonacci became the teacher of the masters of computation and of the surveyors, as one learns from the Summa of Luca Pacioli ... Fibonacci was also the teacher of the "Cossists", who took their name from the word 'causa' which was first used in the West by Fibonacci in place of 'res' or 'radix'. His alphabetic designation for the general number or coefficient was first improved by Vi?te.Fibonacci's work in number theory was almost wholly ignored and virtually unknown during the Middle ages.

Fibonacci's influence was more limited than one might have hoped and apart from his role in spreading the use of the Hindu-Arabic numerals and his rabbit problem, Fibonacci's contribution to mathematics has been largely overlooked. Direct influence was exerted only by those portions of the Liber abaci and of the Practica that served to introduce Hindu-Arabic numerals and methods and contributed to the mastering of the problems of daily life. Here Fibonacci became the teacher of the masters of computation and of the surveyors, as one learns from the Summa of Luca Pacioli ... Fibonacci was also the teacher of the "Cossists", who took their name from the word 'causa' which was first used in the West by Fibonacci in place of 'res' or 'radix'. His alphabetic designation for the general number or coefficient was