Search Results for platos

Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle y does Plato believe that only Philosophers are fit to rule? Essay written by: ALAN T Rather than the practical pursuit we are accustomed to, for Plato, Politics is an intellectual faculty. Governance by non-philosophers is to be governed by opinions, beliefs and self-interest; in contrast the philosopher ruler will govern with virtue and justice with no hidden agenda. The philosopher is in love, in love with learning, knowledge and truth. It is important to make a distinction here bet
Plato vs descartes
Plato vs descartes
plato vs descartes In the field of philosophy there can be numerous answers to a general question, depending on a particular philosophers views on the subject. Often times an answer is left undetermined. In the broad sense of the word and also stated in the dictionary philosophy can be described as the pursuit of human knowledge and human values. There are many different people with many different theories of knowledge. Two of these people, also philosophers, in which this paper will go into de
Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle y does Plato believe that only Philosophers are fit to rule? Essay written by: ALAN T Rather than the practical pursuit we are accustomed to, for Plato, Politics is an intellectual faculty. Governance by non-philosophers is to be governed by opinions, beliefs and self-interest; in contrast the philosopher ruler will govern with virtue and justice with no hidden agenda. The philosopher is in love, in love with learning, knowledge and truth. It is important to make a distinction here bet
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CAPÍTULO LXXXVII CÓMO EL GRAN MONTEZUMA NOS ENVIÓ OTROS EMBAJADORES CON UN PRESENTE DE ORO Y MANTAS, Y LO QUE DIJERON A CORTÉS Y LO QUE LES RESPONDIÓ Ya que estábamos departida para ir nuestro camino a México, vinieron ante Cortés cuatro principales mexicanos que envió Montezuma y trajeron un presente de oro y mantas, y después de hecho su acato, como lo tenían de costumbre, dijeron: “Malinche: este presente te envía nuestro señor el gran Montezuma, y dice que le pesa mucho por el trabajo que ha
Platos cave
Platos cave
platos cave In the Allegory of the Den written by Plato. In his writing he explains human beings live in an underground den, here they have been from their childhood, and have their legs and necks chained so that they cannot move. Being prevented by the chains from turning round their heads. The three areas in modern American life that relate to Platos cave are school, community, and home or personal issues. One of the areas of modern American life that relates to Platos den is school. In grades
Platos Symposium
Platos Symposium
Platos Symposium Throughout history Love has been a topic of conversation. As the topic to the Symposium Socrates and his intellectual partners discuss what Love is and twist it\'s meaning in every possible way. Each attendee of the dinner is given an opportunity to express his feelings and ideas about Love. Love can be molded to fit many styles, shapes, and types. Of those who were attending the Symposium, the majority of the men were homosexual or like Socrates bi-sexual. In this era, men comm
Analysis of Platos Allegory of the Cave
Analysis of Platos Allegory of the Cave
Analysis of Platos Allegory of the Cave Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” presents a vision of humans as slaves chained in front of a fire observing the shadows of things on the cave wall in front of them. The shadows are the only “reality” the slaves know. Plato argues that there is a basic flaw in how we humans mistake our limited perceptions as reality, truth and goodness. The allegory reveals how that flaw affects our education, our spirituality and our politics. The flaw that Plato speaks abou
Platos de feminization of the republic
Platos de feminization of the republic
platos de feminization of the republic Plato\'s suggestion that female guardians do everything male guardians do is a radical and revolutionary proposal in a time when women were viewed as property. However there are complexities and contradictions in the Platonic text on female equality. He makes obvious statements and allusions those women are more cowardly, less trustworthy, innately worse then men. In Book V, he emphasizes that women, as a class are equals to men in capacity, although on the
Plato And Forms
Plato And Forms
Plato And Forms Platos Forms By: Anonymous The influence that Plato, the Greek philosopher born in 427 BC in Athens, has had throughout the history of philosophy has been monumental. Among other things, Plato is known for his exploration of the fundamental problems of natural science, political theory, metaphysics, theology and theory of knowledge; many of his ideas becoming permanent elements in Western thought. The basis of Plato’s philosophy is his theory of Ideas, or doctrine of Forms. While
Platos views on women
Platos views on women
Platos views on women Plato and Socrates’ View of Women’s Roles In studying Greek philosophy, one particular remains consistent. When referring to an ideal person, be it a citizen, a political leader, a philosopher, or a soldier, a man is used for the model. And the aspiration of all men, virtue, is derived from the root for man, "vir." These examples alone would lead the attentive observer to ask, "what about the women?" Traditionally, Greek life in general was not in tune with the rights of wo
Platos Life
Platos Life
Platos Life Plato was born in Athens, about 427 B.C., and died there about 347 B.C. In early life Plato saw war service and had political ambitions. However, he was never really sympathetic to the Athenian democracy and he could not join wholeheartedly in its government. He was a devoted follower of Socrates, whose disciple he became in 409 B.C., and the execution of that philosopher by the democrats in 399 B.C. was a crushing blow. He left Athens, believing that until “kings were philosophers o
Mad About the Insanity Defense
Mad About the Insanity Defense
Mad About the Insanity Defense Today in our legal system, there are many questionable defense tactics. They are designed to protect the rights of the charged, and further the cause of justice. However, in many cases this betterment of justice has been taken too far, and thus pleas such as Temporary insanity are born. Indeed, as will be proven, the insanity defense in itself has been stretched nearly to its breaking point. The insanity defense will be critically examined, here, and proven in so
Platos allegory of the Cave
Platos allegory of the Cave
Platos allegory of the Cave Plato was born 427 BC and died 347 BC He was a pupil under Socrates. During his studies, Plato wrote the Dialogues, which are a collection of Socrates\' teachings. One of the parables included in the Dialogues is "The Allegory of the Cave". "The Allegory..." symbolizes man\'s struggle to reach understanding and enlightenment. First of all, Plato believed that one can only learn through dialectic reasoning and open-mindedness. Humans had to travel from the visible real
Allegory of a cave
Allegory of a cave
Allegory of a cave Is our perception of this world true or is it merely a reflection or shadow of the real world? Can knowledge be passed from teacher to student or must each student travel his own path to enlightenment? Are the enlightened responsible to the rest of society? Are they the only people qualified to run society as a whole? These are the questions that plagued Plato and resulted in his famous portion of The Republic entitled Allegory of the Cave. These questions are very important b
Modern Plato's Cave
Modern Plato's Cave
Modern Plato\'s Cave In the Allegory of the Den written by Plato. In his writing he explains human beings live in an underground den, here they have been from their childhood, and have their legs and necks chained so that they cannot move. Being prevented by the chains from turning round their heads. The three areas in modern American life that relate to Platos cave are school, community, and home or personal issues. One of the areas of modern American life that relates to Platos den is school.
Transmigration of the Soul Platos Theory of Human
Transmigration of the Soul Platos Theory of Human
Transmigration of the Soul Platos Theory of Human Knowledge Plato contended that all true knowledge is recollection. He stated that we all have innate knowledge that tells us about the things we experience in our world. This knowledge, Plato believed, was gained when the soul resided in the invisible realm, the realm of The Forms and The Good. Plato\'s theory of The Forms argued that everything in the natural world is representative of the ideal of that form. For example, a table is representati
Platos Republic1
Platos Republic1
Platos Republic1 Plato on Justice and Injustice In The Republic, Plato attempts to demonstrate through the character and discourse of Socrates that justice is better than justice is the good which men must strive for, regardless of whether they could be unjust and still be rewarded. His method is to use dialectic, the asking and answering of questions which led the hearer from one point to another, supposedly with irrefutable logic by obtaining agreement to each point before going on to the next
Plato and Confucius
Plato and Confucius
Plato and Confucius Platos ideal regime achieve\\'s justice by controlling individuals and their desires by setting down a compact to not tolerate injustice or suffering. By setting down laws and compacts and to name what the law commands lawful and just(Bloom,359a) Plato believed that even individuals who practice justice are forced to do it from the inability to do injustice due to fears of punishment. Plato felt that a democracy or rule of the people gave each man, both just and unjust, licen
Platos Meno and The Eristic Paradox
Platos Meno and The Eristic Paradox
Platos Meno and The Eristic Paradox The Erisitic Paradox and The Slave Boy Throughout history, philosophers have sought to understand the nature of true knowledge and how to achieve it. Most believe that true knowledge is acquired empirically, and not latent in our minds from birth. In Plato’s Meno, Socrates argues in favour of the pre-natal existence of knowledge, the opposite of this proposal: that knowledge is essentially latent, and is brought to light through questioning. The erisitic parad
Plato
Plato
Plato The most comprehensive statement of Platos mature philosophical views appears in The Republic, an extended approach to the most fundamental principles for the conduct of human nature. Using the character Socrates as a fictional spokesman, Plato considers the nature and value of justice and the other virtues as they appear both in the structure of society as a whole, and in the personality of an individual human being. This naturally leads to discussions of human nature, the achievement of
Platos Allegory Of The Cave
Platos Allegory Of The Cave
Platos Allegory Of The Cave This paper discussed The Allegory of The Cave in Plato\'s Republic, and tries to unfold the messages Plato wishes to convey with regard to his conception of reality, knowledge and education. Plato\'s "Allegory of the Cave" is a story that conveys his theory of how we come to know, or how we attain true knowledge. It is also an introduction into his metaphysical and ethical system. In short, it is a symbolic explanation of his "Theory of the Forms" (or eidos). In a cav
Platos rebublic
Platos rebublic
platos rebublic An Eye for an Eye "It is the deed that teaches, not the name we give it. Murder and capital punishment are not opposites that cancel one another but similars that breed their kind" (Brasfield 46). This is the how capital punishment is described by a prisoner on Texas\' death row. In 1972, the United States Supreme Court found capital punishment to be inhumane and cruel towards humans. The death penalty was reinstated in 1976 after the Constitution of the United States was reinter
Platos Republic
Platos Republic
Platos Republic Why do men behave justly? Is it because they fear societal punishment? Are they trembling before notions of divine retribution? Do the stronger elements of society scare the weak into submission in the name of law? Or do men behave justly because it is good for them to do so? Is justice, regardless of its rewards and punishments, a good thing in and of itself? How do we define justice? Plato sets out to answer these questions in the Republic. He wants to define justice, and to de
Platos Symposium
Platos Symposium
Platos Symposium Plato’s Symposium provides us with many different views and theories about love. This drunken discussion of Eros presents ideas which have not lost their relevance in the millennia since. Many things have changed and there have been a lot of different views on almost every subject known to man, but the thoughts voiced in the Symposium still hold truth today. However being what it was, and that is many different peoples thoughts on the subjectof Eros, there is a wide variety of t
Platos works
Platos works
platos works In his works, Plato writes about truth, justice, and reality in full detail. His ideas are greatly deep and persuasively argued. It is from him that all western philosophy is a footnote. He describes his view in a series of numerous dialogues. For my report, I have chosen four of his works to study, which I think were his most important. "The Republic" is a dialogue composed of 10 books. The theme in its entirety is justice. The characters of the dialogue are Socrates, who is the na
Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle y does Plato believe that only Philosophers are fit to rule? Essay written by: ALAN T Rather than the practical pursuit we are accustomed to, for Plato, Politics is an intellectual faculty. Governance by non-philosophers is to be governed by opinions, beliefs and self-interest; in contrast the philosopher ruler will govern with virtue and justice with no hidden agenda. The philosopher is in love, in love with learning, knowledge and truth. It is important to make a distinction here bet
The history tells us that the first display of Eur
The history tells us that the first display of Eur
The history tells us that the first display of European democracy begins, arguably, not in Athens but in Sparta. It seems quite strange that the very first features of democratic society came into the world exactly from this city which defined itself as the direct opposite of the " Open society ". But what really matter to us is Athens, where the earliest innovation of political equality was created, more thoroughly than in Sparta and where newer and more rapid social reforms had occurred. These
Platos symposium addressing the origin of humans
Platos symposium addressing the origin of humans
platos symposium addressing the origin of humans Every civilization has something that captivates its members. Our current civilization has either music or movies. The middle ages had religion. The Romans had powerful generals. The ancient Greeks had stories and plays. There is one thing in common with each of these. The answer is simply myth. Some movies are just different adaptations of myth. Religion is just one big belief that has its origins in myth. The generals would try to become similar
Platos Doctrine of Recollection
Platos Doctrine of Recollection
Platos Doctrine of Recollection Essay 1: Platos Doctrine of Recollection (Sept.29,2000) The doctrine of recollection states that all true knowledge exists implicitly within us, and can be brought to consciousness - made explicit - by recollection. Using the Platonic concepts of Forms, particulars, knowledge and true opinion, this essay explains what can or cannot be recollected, why all knowledge is based on recollection, and why the doctrine does not prove the soul to be immortal. Le
allegory of the cave
allegory of the cave
allegory of the cave Plato's Allegory Of The Cave A Springboard For The Matrix Author: Dew Property of Dew's Matrix Fan Page (http://www.geocities.com/hollywood/theater/9175) IMPORTANT: For those of who are writing Matrix papers for school and wish to use my site as a source remember that all the articles on this site are copyrighted. This means that you MUST list Dew's Matrix Fan Page (http://thereisnospoon.moviefever.com or http://www.geocities.com/hollywood/theater/9175) as a source and site
Platos Republic
Platos Republic
Platos Republic Plato\'s Republic Critics of The Republic, Plato\'s contribution to the history of political theory, have formed two distinct opinions on the reasoning behind the work. The first group believes that The Republic is truly a model for a political society, while the other strongly objects to that, stating it as being far too fantastic for any society to operate successfully by these suggested methods. In an exchange between Crito and Dionysius, this argument is first introduced, wit
Platos allegory of caves
Platos allegory of caves
platos allegory of caves 2. In Book VII of The Republic, Plato tells a story entitled "The Allegory of the Caves." In this story he describes a dark underground cave where a group of people are sitting in one long row with their backs to the cave\'s entrance. Bound to their chairs since childhood, all the humans can see is the distant cave wall in front of them with shadows being displayed. Their view of reality is solely based upon this rather limited view of moving shadows. This is what is rea
Platos Phaedo
Platos Phaedo
Platos Phaedo Platos Phaedo is a dialog between Phaedo, Cebes, and Simmias depicting Socrates explanation as to why death should not be feared by a true philosopher. For if a person truly applies oneself in the right way to philosophy, as the pursuit of ultimate truth, they are preparing themselves for the very act of dying. Plato, through Socrates, bases his proof on the immortality of the soul, and it being the origin of our intellect. Several steps must be taken for the soul to be proven imm
Platos revenge
Platos revenge
platos revenge One\'s opinion, philosophy, or ideology, apparent or hidden can help, or hinder individual or collective development. This hindering action is apparent in Plato\'s Allegory of the Cave, and the action of helping is apparent in Free at Last by Harriet Jacobs. Each of these authors has their own ideology, which they would like to share. In Plato\'s Allegory of the Cave we look into the lives of people whose ideology is chosen for them. These people are forced to sit and stare in one
Platos Ring of Gyges
Platos Ring of Gyges
Platos Ring of Gyges The story of the Ring of Gyges is an excerpt from book two of Plato\'s The Republic, in which Glaucon disagrees with Socrates and insists that people act moral because they lack the power to behave otherwise. In an effort to support his claim, Glaucon recites the tale of Gyges. In this paper, I will include a brief history of Plato, a description of the "Ring of Gyges", and discuss how the story may affect our present lives. Plato was born in 429 B.C. in Athens, Greece, to A
Platos Repulic, book V
Platos Repulic, book V
Platos Repulic, book V ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the viability of certain aspects (the sex lottery) of Plato\'s Republic, book V. It is college level \'A\' paper. Book V of The Republic finds Socrates explaining the practical details necessary in the creation of an ideal polis. He proposes a system for population control and human eugenics based on a lottery of sorts which will determine who will mate with whom and when. The lottery is "rigged" by the rulers in order that the best of the "h
Platos Symposium
Platos Symposium
Platos Symposium What is the meaning of love? What does love feel like? How does love come about? No one can truly explain it, yet somehow it\'s understood. In Plato\'s Symposium, a dinner party was held with the discussion of love as the main topic. Everyone was required to make a speech, an ode to Love, the spirit. The philosopher, Socrates gave his speech last, claiming that his speech was merely a repetition of what a wise woman named Diotima once told him. The speech was a powerful one, but
Platos three waves
Platos three waves
Platos three waves In the Republic, Plato, through his character of Socrates, is searching for the definition of justice. During his search he creates a theoretical city of the kallipolis. This city is to be the ideal, good city. After he establishes this city in his mind he realizes that this city goes against some of the major common thought of his time, and for the city to work it must get passed these obstacles. These obstacles, or waves as Socrates calls them, are vital to the city’s succes
Plato
Plato
Plato Plato, the philosopher, centered his thoughts around the soul, which to him was the principal of life and movement. The immortal wisdom of Plato, is the guidance in which ethical theory and philosophy take root. His mentor was the great philosopher, Socrates. Plato, took the Socratic point of view and developed his main philosophy, which was the philosophy of the soul. THE LIFE OF PLATO Early Life Plato was born in 427 B.C.E. into a wealthy family that was both aristocratic and politically
Present and Discuss the Views submitted by Socrate
Present and Discuss the Views submitted by Socrate
Present and Discuss the Views submitted by Socrates and Thrasymachius in the First Book of Platos Republic In the first book of the Republic Socrates and Thrasymachus argue about the nature of justice. Thrasymachus claims that justice is the advantage of the stronger. He also claims that Socrates\' arguments against that position stem from a naive set of beliefs about the real intentions of rulers, and an uncritical approach to the way words acquire their meaning. Present the arguments on both s
Plato And Forms
Plato And Forms
Plato And Forms Platos Forms By: Anonymous The influence that Plato, the Greek philosopher born in 427 BC in Athens, has had throughout the history of philosophy has been monumental. Among other things, Plato is known for his exploration of the fundamental problems of natural science, political theory, metaphysics, theology and theory of knowledge; many of his ideas becoming permanent elements in Western thought. The basis of Plato�s philosophy is his theory of Ideas, or doctrine of Forms. Whi
Platonic Justice
Platonic Justice
Platonic Justice Throughout Platos Republic, the subject of platonic justice and its goodness to its self arise and are discussed amongst Plato and his peers. At the beginning of The Republic, Plato asks the fundamental question of what is justice? Looking to define the ideal state of justice, Plato reasons that he must first define justice in theory before he can use justice practically. Platonic Justice is defined as being a harmony between the tripartite soul in which reasons guide the spirit
Platos Meno
Platos Meno
Platos Meno The dialogue opens up with Meno asking what virtue is and whether it could be taught. Socrates asks Meno for a general definition of virtue, since as Socrates points out, we cannot figure out if virtue can be taught if we do not have a clear idea what it is. Socrates is looking for a general, or formal definition of virtue, not just examples or instances of it. Socrates wants to know what all the examples of virtue have in common. He wants to know the essence of virtue. Meno initiall
Modern Plato's Cave
Modern Plato's Cave
Modern Plato\'s Cave In the Allegory of the Den written by Plato. In his writing he explains human beings live in an underground den, here they have been from their childhood, and have their legs and necks chained so that they cannot move. Being prevented by the chains from turning round their heads. The three areas in modern American life that relate to Platos cave are school, community, and home or personal issues. One of the areas of modern American life that relates to Platos den is school.
Elements of Childhood in Platos Lysis
Elements of Childhood in Platos Lysis
Elements of Childhood in Platos "Lysis" Childhood in the Ancient world was viewed in somewhat of a different light then in the post Greco-Roman world of Europe circa the Medieval age. For this very reason the attitude, language, and style of the writings that are found from the Ancient world must be considered in the context of their time period. Classical Greek writers like Plato comprised extensive works detailing their own teachings through plays or epic poems. Plato commonly would write play
Modern Platos Cave
Modern Platos Cave
Modern Platos Cave In the Allegory of the Den written by Plato. In his writing he explains human beings live in an underground den, here they have been from their childhood, and have their legs and necks chained so that they cannot move. Being prevented by the chains from turning round their heads. The three areas in modern American life that relate to Platos cave are school, community, and home or personal issues. One of the areas of modern American life that relates to Platos den is school. In
Platos Republic Justified
Platos Republic Justified
Platos Republic Justified In Plato\'s Republic, Socrates leads a discussion with his fellow philosophers attempting to isolate the concept of justice in the soul. In order to accomplish this task, they hypothesize that justice can occur both in the city as well as and the soul. Because the philosophers are more familiar with the workings of a city than the soul, they try to find justice by creating the ideal city, or Kallipolis. When they find justice in the ideal city, they are able to apply as
Plato and Confucious
Plato and Confucious
Plato and Confucious PLATO AND CONFUCIOUS By Brent Monroe Pergram Platos ideal regime achieves justice by controlling individuals and their desires by setting down a compact to not tolerate injustice or suffering. By setting down laws and compacts and to name what the law commands lawful and just.(Bloom,359a) Plato believed that even individuals who practice justice are forced to do it from the inability to do injustice due to fears of punishment. Plato felt that a democracy or rule of the peopl
Platos Republic
Platos Republic
Platos Republic In my opinion, Socrates’ analysis of human nature is very true as it ultimately brings us his definition of justice. I agree with his theory of human nature but not his social-political theory. In order to understand Plato’s theory of human nature and his social-political theory, we must examine each one of them closely. Plato believed that no one is self-sufficient enough to live individually. Human beings are not created equally; some of us are born wiser then the rest and some
Platos criticism of Democracy
Platos criticism of Democracy
Platos criticism of Democracy Consider Plato\'s criticism of Democracy and Democratic Man: Plato, having defined his perfect society, now seeks to compare contemporary \'imperfect\' societies with his ideal standard. He initially criticises the imperfect society as a whole, before leading onto a criticism of any given individual within that society; the imperfect character. He has already dealt with the Oligarchic society and character and now moves onto Democracy and the democratic character. P