Canto Xxviii

Purgatorio
Purgatorio
Purgatorio Dante Alighieri reveals his theology, beliefs, and ideals in his work Divine Comedy. Specifically, in Purgatorio, Dante expresses his view of the importance of love, a view that is not completely homogenous with Catholic doctrine. That view is that through divine grace, all Christians can acquire eternal happiness and immortal love from God regardless of how wicked they lived life, as long as they are repentant. Another aspect of Purgatorio exists in Dante's immersion in the ancient,
Dantes Canto XXVIII
Dantes Canto XXVIII
Dante's Canto XXVIII Dante begins the opening of Canto XXVIII with a rhetorical question. Virgil and he have just arrived in the Ninth Abyss of the Eighth Circle of hell. In this pouch the Sowers of Discord and Schism are continually wounded by a demon with a sword. Dante poses a question to the reader: Who, even with untrammeled words and many attempts at telling, ever could recount in full the blood and wounds that I now saw? (Lines 1-3) The rhetorical question draws the reader into the passa
Dante inferno
Dante inferno
Dante inferno Dante's Inferno: Canto XXVIII Dante’s Divine Comedy is a multi-layered epic, containing not only a story about his incredibly difficult journey from earth to the depths of hell then up to the peaks of heaven, but it also contains many insights on theology, politics, and even his own life. Broken into three canticles—Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso—the work is written in the terza rima form. In Inferno—in 33 Cantos—Dante makes a vast journey through the nine circles of hell. In th