Colonial Militia

The French And Indian War
The French And Indian War
The French and Indian War The French and Indian War was fought on July 9, 1755. This battle took place at Fort Duquesne, in western Pennsylvania, which was one of the many French forts in the Ohio Valley. The fight was between the English army, which was led by General Edward Braddock and the French army, which was led by Captain Beaujeau. The English army included 1,750 British regulars and 450 colonial militia. The French army, which included Indians, included less than 1,000 men. The English
The Need For Gun Control
The Need For Gun Control
The Need For Gun Control Shortly after dusk, a sixteen-year-old boy stands on the street corner talking with a friend about what happened at school today between himself and another student. He nonchalantly stands there sipping his Pepsi when all of a sudden a black Honda with tinted windows drives up to the corner. The window rolls down, a voice calls out, and the boy walks up to the car. He bends down to peer into the car to see who it is when three rounds from a .38 caliber pistol rip through
Bleeding Ireland And Black America
Bleeding Ireland And Black America
Bleeding Ireland and Black America Fall Road is deserted. Only a few dirt-caked, barefoot, Irishmen can be seen shivering in the adjacent park. We walk past the Catholic neighborhoods knowing, at any moment, buildings might explode and automatic weapon fire could lacerate the air on every side of us. Belfast is charming, apart from the harsh reality of guerrilla warfare and terrorism being common occurrences. For the first time, throughout my three month tour of seventeen different European cou
Labor And Unions In America
Labor And Unions In America
Labor and Unions in America The Industrial Revolution was dawning in the United States. At Lowell, Massachusetts, the construction of a big cotton mill began in 1821. It was the first of several that would be built there in the next 10 years. The machinery to spin and weave cotton into cloth would be driven by water power. All that the factory owners needed was a dependable supply of labor to tend the machines. As most jobs in cotton factories required neither great strength nor special skills,
Benedict Arnold
Benedict Arnold
Benedict Arnold Benedict Arnold was born in Norwich, Connecticut. Arnold received his schooling at Canterbury. While away at school, a few of Arnold?s siblings passed away from Yellow Fever. Arnold was a troublesome kid that would try just about anything. As a 14-year-old boy, he ran away from home to fight in the French and Indian War. Later, Benedict Arnold left and returned home through the wilderness alone to work with his cousins. The army had excused him without penalty because of his youn
Boston Tea Party
Boston Tea Party
Boston Tea Party The Boston Tea Party was the key-event for the Revolutionary War. With this act, the colonists started the violent part of the revolution. It was the first try of the colonists, to rebel with violence against their own government. The following events were created by the snowball effect. There, all the colonists realized the first time, that they were treated wrong by the British government. It was an important step towards the independence dream, which was resting in the head o
Oppressed Slaves To Champion Soldiers
Oppressed Slaves To Champion Soldiers
Oppressed Slaves to Champion Soldiers This is just a small example of the doubt and hatred that was bestowed on the African American soldiers. However, during the war, they proved themselves to be brave and courageous men on and off the battlefield on many occasions. Despite deep prejudices and harsh criticisms from the white society, these men were true champions of patriotism. The cause of the Civil War was tension between the North and the South. The sectional division between the areas began
Benedict Arnold
Benedict Arnold
Benedict Arnold Benedict Arnold: Life in the American Revolution On January 14, 1741, Benedict Arnold was born in Norwich, Connecticut. (B Arnold) Arnold?s father, also named Benedict, had a drinking problem and his mother Hannah often worried. (B Arnold) Arnold received his schooling at Canterbury. (B Arnold) While away at school, a few of Arnold?s siblings passed away from Yellow Fever. (B Arnold) Arnold was a troublesome kid that would try just about anything. (B Arnold) As a rebellious 14-ye
Ben Franklin
Ben Franklin
Ben Franklin Ben Franklin: Early Life In his many careers as a printer, moralist, essayist, civic leader, scientist, inventor, statesman, diplomat, and philosopher, for later generations of Americans he became both a spokesman and a model for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Ben?s parents raised thirteen children--the survivors of Josi
Boston Tea Part
Boston Tea Part
The Boston Tea Party The importance of the event The Boston Tea Party was the key-event for the Revolutionary War. With this act, the colonists started the violent part of the revolution. It was the first try of the colonists, to rebel with violence against their own government. The following events were created by the snowball effect. There, all the colonists realized the first time, that they were treated wrong by the British government. It was an important step towards the independence dream,
General William Howe
General William Howe
General William Howe Year of birth: Aug 10 1729 Birth Place: Cumberland England Year of death: July 12 1814 Place of Death: Plymouth England Early Child Hood Charlotte. His grandmother had been the mistress of King George I and as a result Howe and his three brothers were the illegitimate uncles of King George III. Attending Eton, Howe followed his two elder brothers into the military on September 18, 1746 when William Howe was born August 10, 1729, and was the third son of Emanuel Howe, 2nd Vi
John Adams: The Greatest Mind In Politics
John Adams: The Greatest Mind In Politics
John Adams: The Greatest Mind in Politics John Adams is generally not considered to be one of the Founding Fathers. In spite of this, his legacy might even be more important than that of George Washington, who greatly overshadowed Adams. The way he felt toward his position as Washington?s vice president helped to form his political beliefs. His ideas about the way the American government system should go greatly influenced our current government system. While, Adams hated his terms as Vice Presi