Confederate Heroes

Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee Robert Edward Lee is considered one of the greatest generals in the history of the United States. Lee was opposed to many views of the south, including succession and slavery, yet his loyalty to his native state of Virginia forced him to fight for the south and refuse command of the Union armies during the Civil War. Because of this, he was respected by every man in America including Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant. Robert Edward Lee was born to parents, Henry Lee of Leesylvan
Civil War - The Myth Of The Lost Cause
Civil War - The Myth Of The Lost Cause
Civil War - The Myth of the Lost Cause Following the defeat of the Confederacy and to lift the morale of a shattered people momentum gathered to enshrine the Myth of the Lost Cause which would transform the Southern soldier living and dead, into a veritable hero. In order to come to terms with defeat and a look of failure in the eyes of God, Southerners mentally transformed their memories of the antebellum South. It became a superior civilization of great purity which had been cruelly brought do
Biography Of Robert E. Lee
Biography Of Robert E. Lee
Biography of Robert E. Lee Robert E. Lee was born in Stratford Hall, near Montross, Virginia, on January 19, 1807. He grew up with a great love of all country life and his state. This stayed with him for the rest of his life. He was a very serious boy and spent many hours in his father's library. He loved to play with some his friends, swim, and he loved to hunt. Lee looked up to his father and always wanted to know what he was doing. George Washington and his father, Light-Horse Harry Lee, w
Creating a Multicultural Environment
Creating a Multicultural Environment
 As classrooms from primary school to the university level are more culturally diverse than decades ago, the need to infuse multicultural content into the curriculum becomes increasingly evident. The New York Times published an interactive article on diversity in America from 1880 to 2006 that reveal a 61% percent chance of two students selected at random would be members of a different ethnic group. (Diversity in the Classroom, New York Times) But it must be understood that there is more to di