John Fergus

Affirmative Action
Affirmative Action
Affirmative Action Affirmative action works. There are thousands of examples of situations where people of color, white women, and working class women and men of all races who were previously excluded from jobs or educational opportunities, or were denied opportunities once admitted, have gained access through affirmative action. When these policies received executive branch and judicial support, vast numbers of people of color, white women and men have gained access they would not otherwise hav
Juidical Review
Juidical Review
Juidical Review In 1717, Bishop Hoadly told King George I, Whoever hath an absolute authority to interpret written or spoken laws; it is he who is truly the lawgiver to all intents and purposes and not the person who wrote or spoke them (Pollack, 153). Early sentiments similar these have blossomed in to a large scale debate over which branch of our government has the power to overturn laws that do not follow the foundations of our democratic system; the constitution. In this paper I will discu
Segregation And The Civil Rights Movement
Segregation And The Civil Rights Movement
Segregation and The Civil Rights Movement Segregation was an attempt by white Southerners to separate the races in every sphere of life and to achieve supremacy over blacks. Segregation was often called the Jim Crow system, after a minstrel show character from the 1830s who was an old, crippled, black slave who embodied negative stereotypes of blacks. Segregation became common in Southern states following the end of Reconstruction in 1877. During Reconstruction, which followed the Civil War (18
John Marshall Harlan II
John Marshall Harlan II
John Marshall Harlan II John Marshall Harlan II was born on May 20, 1899 in Chicago, Illinois. He was born to John Maynard Harlan, an attorney, and Elizabeth Flagg Harlan. John Marshall Harlan II came from a long line of political servants, of whom his grandfather is probably most notable. John Marshall Harlan I, whom John Marshall Harlan II was named after, sat on the Supreme Court as an Associate Justice from 1877 to 1911. Johan Marshall Harlan II is best remembered as the lone dissenter of th
Civil Rights
Civil Rights
Civil Rights Civil Rights Movement: 1890-1900 1890: The state of Mississippi adopts poll taxes and literacy tests to discourage black voters. 1895: Booker T. Washington delivers his Atlanta Exposition speech, which accepts segregation of the races. 1896: The Supreme Court rules in Plessy v. Ferguson the separate but equal treatment of the races is constitutional. 1900-1910 1900-1915: Over one thousand blacks are lynched in the states of the former Confederacy. 1905: The Niagara Movement is found
Cival Rights Act 1964
Cival Rights Act 1964
Cival Rights Act 1964 When the Government Stood Up For Civil Rights All my life I've been sick and tired, and now I'm just sick and tired of being sick and tired. No one can honestly say Negroes are satisfied. We've only been patient, but how much more patience can we have? Mrs. Hamer said these words in 1964, a month and a day before the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964 would be signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson. She speaks for the mood of a race, a race that for centuries has b
First And Second Reconstructions
First And Second Reconstructions
First and Second Reconstructions The First and Second Reconstructions held out the great promise of rectifying racial injustices in America. The First Reconstruction, emerging out of the chaos of the Civil War had as its goals equality for Blacks in voting, politics, and use of public facilities. The Second Reconstruction emerging out of the booming economy of the 1950's, had as its goals, integration, the end of Jim Crow and the more amorphous goal of making America a biracial democracy where,
I've Read The New Jim Crow …
I've Read The New Jim Crow …
I've Read The New Jim Crow … How to tell if a prosecutor is only pretending to be a criminal justice reformer. In the past few years, a new breed of district attorney has risen to power. In places like Chicago, Orlando, and St. Louis, prosecutors have committed to making the American criminal justice system less punitive and more humane. In many other locales, elected prosecutors have sensed the change in tides and adapted their message even as they've refused to scrap their outdated metho
Margaret Laurence
Margaret Laurence
Margaret Laurence Jean Margaret (Peggy) Wemyss was born in Neepewa, Manitoba on July 18, 1926 to Robert Harrison Wemyss, a lawyer, and Verna Jean, nee Simpson. Margaret?s mother died when she was only four and her father later married her sister, Margaret Cambell Simpson, a teacher and later a librarian. She was throughout the years one of Margaret?s greatest encouragers. After her father?s death, when she was nine and her brother still a baby, the family went to live with Grandfather Simpson in