John J Russell

Joseph Bernardin
Joseph Bernardin
Joseph Bernardin Cardinal Joseph Bernardin Cardinal Joseph Bernardin was born on April 2,1928, in Columbia, South Carolina. He was son of Mrs. Marie M. Simon Bernardin, and the late Joseph Bernardin. Cardinal Bernardin attended Catholic and public schools and the University of South Carolina in Columbia. He was later accepted as a candidate for the priesthood by Most Rev. John J. Russell, then Bishop of Charleston. He studied at the following Colleges: St.Mary's, St. Mary, Kentucky, St.Mary Semi
Al Capone
Al Capone
Al Capone Al Capone was an Italian criminal working the streets of America. He started his life with petty crime in Brooklyn, New York. After escalating his way up in Brooklyn, Capone moved to Chicago for bigger and better things. There Capone had prominence supremacy as one of the giant bootlegging forerunners. His collected and composed ways, made crime into a business that we see in today's mafia. Capone changed crime into a profession, which in turn made it a business. The word mob or mafia
Astronomers
Astronomers
Astronomers Part One Brief Descriptions of the Following Astronomers: Walter Baade : Baade was a German-born American, whose work gave new estimates for the age and size of the universe. During the wartime, blackouts aided his observatons and allowed him to indentify and classify stars in a new and useful way, and led him to increase and improve Hubble's values for the size and age of the universe (to the great relief of geologists.) He also worked on supernovae and radiostars. Milton Humason :
John Dryden
John Dryden
John Dryden John Dryden: England's Controversial and Exceptional Genius John Dryden was England's most outstanding and controversial writer for the later part of the seventeenth century, dominating the literary world as a skilled and versatile dramatist, a pioneer of literary criticism, and a respected writer of the Restoration period. With Dryden's great literary and critical influence on the English society during the Restoration period he has made a name for himself, which will be studied and
Dolly Madison
Dolly Madison
Dolly Madison Dolly Payne Madison was born in Guilford County, North Carolina on May 20, 1768. Dolly was born the first girl in a family of several children to Quaker parents, John Payne and Mary Coles. She spent her childhood in Scotchtown, Virginia. The Paynes were well connected and sufficiently prosperous, small planters in Hanover County.1 The Quaker house forbade festivity, shunned amusement and frowned upon the world's vanities. After a preliminary visit to Philadelphia, John Payne retu
Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria Queen Victoria was born in 1819 and she died in 1901. She was queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1837-1901) and empress of India (1876-1901). Queen Victoria was born Alexandrina Victoria on May 24, 1819, in Kensington Palace, London. Victoria's mother was Victoria Mary Louisa, daughter of the duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. Her father was Edward Augustus, duke of Kent and Strathern, the fourth son of George III and youngest brother of George IV and William IV,
William Butler Yeats
William Butler Yeats
William Butler Yeats On June 13 1865 William Butler Yeats was born in Dublin Ireland. From the start Yeats had artistic influences, due to the fact that his father Jack Butler Yeats was a noted Irish painter. He had no formal education until he was eleven, at that time he started at the Godolphin Grammar School in Hammer*censored*h England and later he enrolled in Erasmus Smith High School in Dublin. Throughout his schooling he was considered disappointing student, his studies were inconsistent,
John Updike
John Updike
John Updike John Hoyer Updike was born March 18, 1932 to Linda Grace Updike and Wesley Russell Updike in Reading, Pennsylvania. Wesley Updike was originally from New Jersey where he worked as a telephone splicer and was laid off from his job during the depression. Wesley Updike met his wife Linda Updike in New Jersey. After Wesley Updike was laid off in New Jersey they moved to Shillington, Pennsylvania where Linda Updike was from. Wesley Updike became a teacher at the local High School. ( Updik
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau He spent his life in voluntary poverty, enthralled by the study of nature. Two years, in the prime of his life, were spent living in a shack in the woods near a pond. Who would choose a life like this? Henry David Thoreau did, and he enjoyed it. Who was Henry David Thoreau, what did he do, and what did others think of his work? Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts on July 12, 1817 (Thoreau 96), on his grandmother's farm. Thoreau, who was of French-Huguenot
Dimitri Shostakovich
Dimitri Shostakovich
Dimitri Shostakovich Dmitri Shostakovich Dmitri Shostakovich, born on September 25, 1905, started taking piano lessons from his mother at the age of nine after he showed interest in a string quartet that practiced next door. He entered the Petrograd (formerly St. Petersburg, later Leningrad) Conservatory in 1919, where he studied the piano with Leonid Nikolayev until 1923 and composition until 1925 with Aleksandr Glazunov and Maksimilian Steinberg. He participated in the Chopin International Com
Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby Bill Cosby was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 12, 1937. He was the oldest of four boys. He had three brothers, and their names were: James, Russell, and Robert. His father ran away near Christmas time when he was very young and he had to get a job to help support the family. In school he was the class clown and was sent to a special school for rowdy boys. In his new school his teacher was Mary Forchic. She saw that he was a great comedian and she put that into her lessons
Western Expansion
Western Expansion
Western Expansion THE WESTWARD EXPANSION Introduction The Westward Expansion has often been regarded as the central theme of American history, down to the end of the19th century and as the main factor in the shaping of American history. As Frederick Jackson Turner says, the greatest force or influence in shaping American democracy and society had been that there was so much free land in America and this profoundly affected American society. Motives After the revolution, the winning of independen
Alcoholism
Alcoholism
Alcoholism CUNNING, BAFFLING, POWERFUL, PATIENT AND DEADLY Alcoholism: Today's substance abuse, whether alcohol or drugs, continues to be a major social problem. Common patterns occur in all forms of substance abuse. While some types of substance abuse problems are slightly different in terms of causes and cures, experts agree that there are some do's and don'ts which relate to kicking the abuse habit. If you or a loved one have a substance abuse problem, this article can give you sound advice o
civil war
civil war
Emancipation Proclamation Abraham Lincoln had written drafts of his idea on paper in the spring of 1862, and while he made it clear that he did not call upon them for their approval he did want their advice on when to present the proclamation as documented in John G and John hays book Abraham Lincoln A history volume 6(1890). The North had lost a couple of battles already and under the advice of Secretary of State William Seward he waited until after the Battle of Antietam to make it public or o
Josy Chapman
Josy Chapman
Josy Chapman February 19, Periods/ Eras of Modern Times Ars Nova Era Circa 1200- Circa 1450 -http://www.britannica.com/art/Ars-Nova-music (New Art), in music history, period of the tremendous flowering of music in the 14th century, particularly in HYPERLINK http://www.britannica.com/place/France France. The designation Ars Nova opposed to the Ars Antiqua of 13th-century France. It was title of a treatise written about 1320 by the composer HYPERLINK http://www.britannica.com/biography/Phili
Lizzie Borden
Lizzie Borden
Lizzie Borden Lizzie Andrew Borden (July 19, 1860-June 1, 1927) It is best described by the closing arguments for Lizzie Borden's defense, made by her attorney, George D. Robinson: The Lizzie Borden case has mystified and fascinated those interested in crime forover on hundred years. Very few cases in American history have attracted as much attention as the hatchet murders of Andrew J. Borden and his wife, Abby Borden. The bloodiness of the acts in an otherwise respectable late nineteenth centur