Magical Realism

Bless Me Ultima - Tony
Bless Me Ultima - Tony
Bless Me Ultima - Tony Blood becomes the river. The human race dies and only the she-goats and the he-goats remain (176). The lake cracked with laughter of madness and the ghosts stood and walked upon the shore (120). Who dares dream such gruesome images? Only Antonio Marez. He argues with God and the Virgin Mary. He commutes with the dead; the dead asks him for blessings. Just who is this Tony person! You might not believe that this is only a seven year old kid, but he is the hero of Rudo
Alice In Wonderland
Alice In Wonderland
Alice in Wonderland Through the writing of Lewis Carroll in the story Alice in Wonderland the difference between fantasy and reality can be seen through the eyes of a child. The stories created by Carroll are a combination of make believe stories made to entertain children he talked to on an almost daily basis. Seen as odd by adults in society Carroll better associated himself with children because of his stammering disability when speaking. Carroll the man of many talents was born Charles Lutwi
Shame
Shame
Shame Criticism of Shame Shame, published in 1983, a year before his most famous work The Satanic Verses, presents a fabulistic account in a country that disturbingly represents Pakistan. Critically, Shame is compared to Midnight?s Children because the of its resemblances in themes and style. The idea for Shame, reported interviewer Ronal Hayman in Books and Bookmen, grew out of Rushdie?s interest in the Pakistani concept of sharam, a word that denotes a hybrid of embarrassment, discomfiture, de
Variaciones Borges 19 (2005) BORGES' REVISIONING O
Variaciones Borges 19 (2005) BORGES' REVISIONING O
Variaciones Borges 19 (2005) BORGES' REVISIONING OF READING IN PIERRE MENARD, AUTHOR OF THE QUIXOTE w Howard Giskin n much of his work Borges cultivates the idea that what is about to be related is at best the product of successive attempts to make sense of circumstances whose retelling is subject to the whimsies of memory and personal inclinations to interpret the truth. Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote, one of Borges' most well known stories, through just such a narration has implicat