Philosophical Statements

Superstitions
Superstitions
Superstitions The debate between realism and anti-realism is, at least, a century old. Does Science describe the real world ? or are its theories true only within a certain conceptual framework? Is science only instrumental or empirically adequate or is there more to it than that? Jose Ortega y Gasset said (in an unrelated exchange) that all ideas stem from pre-rational beliefs. William James concurred by saying that accepting a truth often requires an act of will which goes beyond facts and int
Titanic
Titanic
Titanic The film Titanic is riddled with moral dilemmas. In one of the scenes, the owner of Star Line, the shipping company that owned the now-sinking Unsinkable, joins a lowered life-boat. The tortured expression on his face demonstrates that even he experiences more than unease at his own conduct. Prior to the disaster, he instructs the captain to adopt a policy dangerous to the ship. Indeed, it proves fatal. A complicating factor was the fact that only women and children were allowed by the
Taoism
Taoism
Taoism Throughout history, Taoism has been one of the most influential religions of Eastern culture. This is certainly one of the most unique of all religions. Many Taoists, in fact, do not even consider it a religion; and in many ways it is not. Taoists make no claim that the Tao exists.1 That is what essentially separates Taoism from the rest of the world religions: there is no heated debate or battle over Taoist doctrine; there have been no crusades to spread the religion. The very essence of
Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia Throughout the text, Tom Stoppard?s novel Arcadia makes a series of philosophical statements regarding the theme of determinism. These statements are developed largely through images and completely different time periods, particularly those of the Romantic and Enlightenment era?s. Tom Stoppard uses the theme of determinism to show how the ideas of the Romantic era and the present day have gone in a circle. And that even though we get more and more advanced everyday, Stoppard shows us tha
Invisible Man
Invisible Man
Invisible Man According to Goethe, We do not have to visit a madhouse to find disordered minds; our planet is the mental institution of the universe. Despite the hyperbolic nature of Goethe?s statement, it holds some truth. Because of this element of truth, society looks to psychoanalysis as an important tool for understanding human nature. Furthermore, psychoanalytic criticism of authors, characters, and readers has a place in literary criticism that is as important as the place of psychoanal
Descartes
Descartes
Descartes Rene Descartes was one of the most influential thinkers in the history of the philosophy. Born in 1596, he lived to become a great mathematician, scientist, and philosopher. In fact, he became one of the central intellectual figures of the sixteen hundreds. He is believed by some to be the father of modern philosophy, although he was hampered by living in a time when other prominent scientists, such as Galileo, were persecuted for their discoveries and beliefs. Although this probably h
Ben Franklin
Ben Franklin
Ben Franklin Ben Franklin: Early Life In his many careers as a printer, moralist, essayist, civic leader, scientist, inventor, statesman, diplomat, and philosopher, for later generations of Americans he became both a spokesman and a model for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Ben?s parents raised thirteen children--the survivors of Josi
Dantes Canto XXVIII
Dantes Canto XXVIII
Dante's Canto XXVIII Dante begins the opening of Canto XXVIII with a rhetorical question. Virgil and he have just arrived in the Ninth Abyss of the Eighth Circle of hell. In this pouch the Sowers of Discord and Schism are continually wounded by a demon with a sword. Dante poses a question to the reader: Who, even with untrammeled words and many attempts at telling, ever could recount in full the blood and wounds that I now saw? (Lines 1-3) The rhetorical question draws the reader into the passa
Compare Mill And Kants Ethical Theories; Which Makes A Better Societal
Compare Mill And Kants Ethical Theories; Which Makes A Better Societal
Compare Mill and Kant's ethical theories; which makes a better societal order? John Stuart Mill (1808-73) believed in an ethical theory known as utilitarianism. There are many formulation of this theory. One such is, Everyone should act in such a way to bring the largest possibly balance of good over evil for everyone involved. However, good is a relative term. What is good? Utilitarians disagreed on this subject. Mill made a distinction between happiness and sheer sensual pleasure. He define
kjl
kjl
Journal of the Kuala Lumpur Royal Malaysia Police College, No. 3, 2004 CRIME PREVENTION DCP Walter J. Rugbere1 INTRODUCTION I intend to approach this topic from an underlying philosophical impulse, which I have found useful as a springboard for take-off, each time there is an opportunity to examine the issue of crime prevention. It is my view that the legitimacy and authority of the state over the people can be sustained only to the extent it can guarantee the security of life and property of th
Critical Thinking
Critical Thinking
This essay is to raise the question Is there such a thing as mental illness?? Since the belief of mental illness is widely used, inquiry into the ways in which this term is employed would seem to be especially indicated. Thomas Szasz believes mental illness does not exist (Szasz, 1961) whereas the American Psychiatric Association believes it is an illness and treats it as such (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The idea of mental illness stems its main support from such phenomena as syp
Futurism in Art
Futurism in Art
Art movements originate from the need of people to express their reactions to political, social and religious changes. The aim of this expression is to illustrate the artist?s perspective on matters. The Futurism movement is unparalleled in modern art with its aggressive and bold manner. Futurism was born in the heart of Italy in the early 20th Century. Powerful and shameless, these artists asserted their discontent with modern society. They criticised traditional conventionalism and demanded so
Frederick Winslow Taylor
Frederick Winslow Taylor
Frederick Winslow Taylor Frederick Winslow Taylor (March 20, 1856 March 21, 1915) was an American mechanical engineer who sought to improve industrial efficiency.[2] He was one of the first management consultants.[3] Taylor was one of the intellectual leaders of the Efficiency Movement and his ideas, broadly conceived, were highly influential in the Progressive Era. Taylor summed up his efficiency techniques in his book The Principles of Scientific Management. Taylor\'s pioneering work in appl
CCNY PHIL 102 00 Section L : Introduction to Philo
CCNY PHIL 102 00 Section L : Introduction to Philo
CCNY PHIL 102 00 Section L : Introduction to Philosophy Fall 201 6 Professor: Damion K. Scott Classroom: NAC 1/203 Office: NAC 5/144 Class Hours: Tu/Thu 9:30 - 10:45am Phone: (347)   581 4653 Office Hours: By Appointment Email: [email protected] Required Texts : Plato The Trial and Death of Socrates. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2000. Descartes, Rene Meditations on First Philosophy. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 1993. Kant, Immanuel Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics 1783 King,
Socrates was a Greek philosopher who founded the f
Socrates was a Greek philosopher who founded the f
Socrates was a Greek philosopher who founded the fundamental principles of western philosophy. He is best known for influencing the greatest minds of the ancient world, and engaging in long philosophical discussions on education, religion, politics, and ethics. Despite being one of the most knowledgeable men in the western world there are no records or text s that Socrates wrote himself. Our knowledge of his teachings comes directly from his disciples . Plato, o ne of Socrates's most successful
Variaciones Borges 19 (2005) BORGES' REVISIONING O
Variaciones Borges 19 (2005) BORGES' REVISIONING O
Variaciones Borges 19 (2005) BORGES' REVISIONING OF READING IN PIERRE MENARD, AUTHOR OF THE QUIXOTE w Howard Giskin n much of his work Borges cultivates the idea that what is about to be related is at best the product of successive attempts to make sense of circumstances whose retelling is subject to the whimsies of memory and personal inclinations to interpret the truth. Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote, one of Borges' most well known stories, through just such a narration has implicat