Poetics

The Life Of Aristotle
The Life Of Aristotle
The Life of Aristotle When Plato died in 347 bc, Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias (died 345 bc), was ruler. There he counseled Hermias and married his niece and adopted daughter, Pythias. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians, Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athe
Hamlet - Analyzed In Terms Of Aristotles Poetics
Hamlet - Analyzed In Terms Of Aristotles Poetics
Hamlet - Analyzed in Terms of Aristotle's Poetics Aristotle's Poetics is considered the guide to a well written tragedy; his methods have been used for centuries. In Aristotle's opinion, plot is the most important aspect of the tragedy, all other parts such as character, diction, and thought stem from the plot. Aristotle defines a tragedy as ...an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the severa
Macbeth - Tragedy
Macbeth - Tragedy
Macbeth - Tragedy William Shakespeare is the noted author of a vast array of plays, ranging from comedies to histories to tragedies. Perhaps one of his most famous in the tragedy genre is Macbeth. Though Shakespeare can be considered as a scholar in the sense that he was both a renowned and prolific playwright, look back a few hundred years to find Aristotle, one of the most famous scholars and philosophers of all time. In his treatise titled Poetics, he defends poetry against criticism as well
Ambition
Ambition
Ambition What Drives A Man What makes a successful man? This, in itself, is a culture bound question because it can vary from culture to culture. However, in the perception of Okonkwo, the main character in Chinua Achebe's novel, Things Fall Apart, the measure of a man's success is based on two elements, material acquisition and growth, and physical prowess. This is ironic for Okonkwo since his people's typical idea of success seems to be constructed of a complex, strong spiritual culture, seemi
Penelope As Moral Agent
Penelope As Moral Agent
Penelope as Moral Agent In her essay Penelope as Moral Agent, Helene Foley attempts to discuss Penelope, a major character in Homer's the Odyssey, in terms of Classical Athenian portrayals of women and, as her title suggests, in terms of what she calls a moral agent. In her introductory paragraph she lays out guidelines as set down by Aristotle and his contemporaries that constitute a moral agent: the character must make an ethical and moral decision on which the actions turns?without criti
Emily Dickenson
Emily Dickenson
Emily Dickenson Faith Is Not All It?s Cracked Up to Be. While much of Emily Dickinson's poetry has been described as sad or morose, the poet did use humor and irony in many of her poems. This essay will address the humor or irony found in five of Dickinson's poems: Faith is a Fine Invention (185), I'm Nobody! Who are you? , A Service of Song and Success Is Counted Sweetest . The attempt will be made to show how Dickinson used humor or irony for the dual purposes of comic relief and to stress an
Tennessee Williams - Outcasts In His Plays
Tennessee Williams - Outcasts In His Plays
Tennessee Williams - Outcasts in His Plays More than a half century has passed since critics and theater-goers recognized Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) as an important American playwright, whose plays fellow dramaturge David Mamet calls the greatest dramatic poetry in the American language (qtd. in Griffin 13). Williams's repertoire includes some 30 full-length plays, numerous short plays, two volumes of poetry, and five volumes of essays and short stories. He won two Pulitzer Prizes (for A S
Aristotle On Tragedy
Aristotle On Tragedy
Aristotle on Tragedy The Nature of Tragedy: In the century after Sophocles, the philosopher Aristotle analyzed tragedy. His definition: Tragedy then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play; in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions. Aristotle identified six basic
Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle Aristotle was born in 384 BC and lived until 322 BC. He was a Greek philosopher and scientist, who shares with Plato being considered the most famous of ancient philosophers. He was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, the son of a physician to the royal court. When he was 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy. He stayed for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 BC, Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his named He
Chapter I
Chapter I
Chapter I Nautanki as Performative Art F orm Once in a land, far away, there lived a princess of peerless beauty. The radiant glow of her body made the moon' s turn pale. Her eyes were like a doe's she had the voice of cuckoo. When she laughed, jasmine blossoms fell. In the prime of her youth, she maddened men with her lotus-like breasts and the three folds at her waist. She was so graceful that her weight could be measured onl y against a p ortion of flowers. This princess was known in many di
An Introduction to Literary Criticism
An Introduction to Literary Criticism
An Introduction to Literary Criticism Definition of Criticism: Literary criticism deals with different dimensions of literature as a collection of texts through which authors evoke fictitious worlds for the imagination of readers. English word criticism is derived from the ancient Greek term krites , meaning judge. Thus, Criticism can be defined as the act of judging. Literary criticism endeavors to form a correct estimate of literary productions. Its effort is to see a piece of writing as
Sir Philip Sidney
Sir Philip Sidney
Sir Philip Sidney The history of English criticism, like that of English literature, divides itself roughly into three periods. The first is the period of the Elizabethans and of Milton; the second is from the Restoration to the French Revolution; the third from the Revolution to the present day. Elizabethan critics run side by side with those of the early Greeks. It is doubtless true that the Elizabethan critics give a partially larger space to the more technical sides of the subject than thei
Plato and Aristotle
Plato and Aristotle
: Plato and Aristotle : Plato. Attempts to strip artists of the power and prominence they enjoy in his society, while Aristotle tries to develop a method of inquiry to determine the merits of an individual work of art. Both philosophers are concerned with the artist's ability to have significant impact on others. It is the imitative function of art which promotes disdain in Plato and curiosity. Both philosophers hold radically different notions of reality. The assumptions each man makes about tru
Plato and Aristotle
Plato and Aristotle
: Plato and Aristotle : Plato. Attempts to strip artists of the power and prominence they enjoy in his society, while Aristotle tries to develop a method of inquiry to determine the merits of an individual work of art. Both philosophers are concerned with the artist's ability to have significant impact on others. It is the imitative function of art which promotes disdain in Plato and curiosity. Both philosophers hold radically different notions of reality. The assumptions each man makes about tru