Polyneices

Antigone Tragic Hero
Antigone Tragic Hero
Antigone Tragic Hero The debate over who is the tragic hero in Antigone continues on to this day. The belief that Antigone is the hero is a strong one. There are many critics who believe, however, that Creon, the Ruler of Thebes, is the true protagonist. Many have argued with no conclusion of who the real tragic hero of the play is. Sophocles might?ve done this purposely in the play to keep the audience on their toes. I have made my own judgments also, based on what I have researched of this wor
Antigone (Creon As The Tragic Hero)
Antigone (Creon As The Tragic Hero)
Antigone (Creon As the Tragic Hero) Creon as the Tragic Hero In Antigone written by Sophocles, Creon is the tragic hero. Creon is the tragic hero because of his error in judgement, stubborn way of ruling Thebes, his change, and all the tragedy brought on by his actions. Although Creon changed only when a messenger told him there would be a tragic ending because of all his actions, he did try to correct what he had done. Creon ordered that Polyneices? body be left out to be eaten by vultures andw
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Antigone - Kreon as a Tragic Hero Kreon as a Tragic Hero In Antigone, both Antigone and Kreon could be considered the tragic hero of the play. A tragic hero, defined by A Dictionary of Literary, Dramatic and Cinematic Terms, is someone who suffers due to a tragic flaw, or hamartia. This Greek word is variously translated as tragic flaw or error or weakness . Kreon?s hamartia, like in many plays, is hybris ? Greek for overweening pride, arrogance, or excessive confidence. Kreon?s hybris
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Antigone The tyrant dies and his rule ends, the martyr dies and his rule begins. (Kierkegaard) In terms of Antigone, this quotation makes a lot of sense. If a tyrant's, or a cruel dictator-like person's, role is to diminish, he/she will not necessarily die, but his/her popularity will most definitely decline. As the contrary is true for a martyr, or a person who suffers so as to keep his/her faith and/or principles. He/She will pretty much never die. Through the old, Greek play Antigo
Medea
Medea
Medea Medea vs. Antigone The two Greek plays, Medea and Antigone both exhibit opening scenes that serve numerous purposes. Such as establishing loyalties, undermining assumptions on the part of the audience, foreshadowing the rest of the play, and outlining all of the issues. Medea and Antigone share many similarities in their openings. Both plays begin with providing the audience with the history and the consequences of certain situations that the characters were involved in. It also brings the
Themes
Themes
Themes The three major themes are love, loyalty, and irony; the most major themebeing irony. Antigone's love for her brother, Polyneices, was so strong, she died forhim. Haemon's love for Antigone was so strong, he died with her death. Eurydice's love for her son, Haemon, was so strong, she died with his death. Creon's guilt and love for his wife and son was so strong, he felt he should notgo on living after their death. . . . I speak for you, for me, and for the spirits ofthe dead. . . The de
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Sophocles' trilogy of Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone is a powerful, tragic tale that examines the nature of human guilt, fate and punishment. Creon, Oedipus' uncle and brother-in-law, is the story's most dynamic character. His character experiences a drastic metamorphosis through the span of the three dramas. Creon's vision of a monarch's proper role, his concept of and respect for justice, as well as his respect for the design evolve considerably by the trilogy's t
Sophocles Antigone
Sophocles Antigone
Sophocles' Antigone The debate over who is the tragic hero in Antigone continue on to this day. The belief that Antigone is the hero is a strong one. There are many critics who believe, however, that Creon, the Ruler of Thebes, is the true protagonist. I have made my own judgments also, based on what I have researched of this work by Sophocles. Antigone is widely thought of as the tragic hero of the play bearing her name. She would seem to fit the part in light of the fact that she dies in doin
Conflicting Values In Antigone
Conflicting Values In Antigone
Conflicting Values in Antigone In the play Antigone by Sophocles, Creon and Antigone have distinct conflicting values. Creon's regard for the laws of the city causes him to abandon all other beliefs. He feels that all should obey the laws set forth by him, even if other beliefs, moral or religious, state otherwise. Antigone, on the other hand, hold the beliefs of the gods in high reverence. She feels that the laws of the gods should be obeyed above all others, especially when in respect to fa