Protagonist

Meghan Reid
Meghan Reid
Meghan Reid Professor Zimmerman Honors English December 1, 1998 Nature and the Human Soul: The Shackles of Freedom Langston Hughes and Kate Chopin use nature in several dimensions to demonstrate the powerful struggles and burdens of human life. Throughout Kate Chopin?s The Awakening and several of Langston Hughes? poems, the sweeping imagery of the beauty and power of nature demonstrates the struggles the characters confront, and their eventual freedom from those struggles. Nature and freedom c
The Reign Of Edward VI
The Reign Of Edward VI
The Reign of Edward VI The reign of Edward VI saw great religious upheaval from a Protestant religion that was Catholic in nature to a more clearly defined and radical quasi-Calvinism. In that sense religious policy hardened. But the policies and ideal never became deeply entrenched and accepted throughout the country and often only existed to serve the interests of those who enacted them, and not the future stance of the church. Under Somerset the changes involved merely creating a Protestant
An Analysis Of White Butterfly
An Analysis Of White Butterfly
An Analysis of White Butterfly In all of his books, Walter Mosley captures the environment and personalities of African Americans throughout post WWII history. His first book A Devil in a Blue Dress was met with instant acclaim. In this book he introduced one of the most unique sleuths that the literary world had seen. This 20th century Sherlock's name is Easy Rawlins. In each Easy Rawlins mystery, Mosley brings out a certain aspect of his protagonist's life and uses it as a subplot. In his thi
King Lear
King Lear
King Lear In Act 1, Scene 1 Kent says, See better, Lear. How does Lear ?see? more clearly by Act V Scene 3, and what has led him to this? King Lear of Britain, the ageing protagonist in Shakespeare?s tragic play undergoes radical change as a man, father and king as the plot progresses when forced to bear the repercussions of his actions. Lear is initially portrayed as being an egotistical ruler, relying on protestations of love from his daughters to apportion his kingdom. Lear?s tragic flaw is
Hamlet
Hamlet
Hamlet In William Shakespeare's Hamlet, the protagonist exhibits a puzzling, duplicitous nature. Hamlet contradicts himself throughout the play. He endorses both the virtues of acting a role and that of being true to one's self. He further supports both of these conflicting endorsements with his actions. This ambiguity is demonstrated by his alleged madness, for he does behave madly,only to become perfectly calm and rational an instant later. These inconsistencies are related with the internal d
The Tempest: Caliban
The Tempest: Caliban
The Tempest: Caliban As an actor, select one character from ?The Tempest? and discuss how you would create the role, bearing in mind its function in the plot and its relationship to other characters. I have chosen Caliban to discuss, since, as an actor, I find him the most interesting character and thus the most enjoyable to discuss. Caliban?s function in the plot is one that is difficult to define. He is not the key protagonist, since this title belongs to the treacherous Alonso in his usurpati
Tamed Shrews And Twelfth Nights: The Role Of Women In Shakespeare
Tamed Shrews And Twelfth Nights: The Role Of Women In Shakespeare
Tamed Shrews and Twelfth Nights: The Role of Women In Shakespeare It is curious to note the role of women in Shakespearean literature. Many critics have lambasted the female characters in his plays as two-dimensional and unrealistic portrayals of subservient women. Others have asserted that the roles of women in his plays were prominent for the time and culture that he lived in. That such contrasting views could be held in regards to the same topic is academic. It is only with close examination
Hamlet - Collective Unconscious In Hamlet
Hamlet - Collective Unconscious In Hamlet
Hamlet - Collective Unconscious in Hamlet The famous psychologist Carl Jung believed that the universe and all of its inhabitants are made up of a measureless web of thought called the collective unconscious, it?s suggests that the collective unconscious is rooted in the genetic code of every living thing. This collective unconscious is evident in an individual?s personality, which is comprised of five separate personalities blended together; these are called archetypes. In Jungian psychology, t
Richard III
Richard III
Richard III The tragedy of Richard III lies in the progressive isolation of its protagonist. Discuss. From the very opening of the play when Richard III enters solus, the protagonist's isolation is made clear. Richard's isolation progresses as he separates himself from the other characters and breaks the natural bonds between Man and nature through his efforts to gain power. The first scene of the play begins with a soliloquy, which emphasizes Richard's physical isolation as he appears alone
Shakespeare - Tragic Heros
Shakespeare - Tragic Heros
Shakespeare - Tragic Heros The name tragic hero , which has become synonymous with Shakespearean dramas, was developed before Hamlet, Macbeth or any of Shakespeare?s well-known plays were written. The literary term was actually discovered around 330 BC by the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle. Through his theory of catharsis, Aristotle debated that the great plays of Sophicles, Euripides, and other Greek playwrights contained tragic heroes similar to each other, which all portrayed four basic
Othello - The Greatest Tragedy
Othello - The Greatest Tragedy
Othello - The Greatest Tragedy A Shakespearean tragedy is one that encompasses many different elements. Shakespeare presents all of these elements spectacularly in Othello. For a tragedy to occur there are five conditions. The protagonist, Othello in this case, must experience a death or a total loss of ranking in society. The audience must also be captured by the actors and feel some sort of connection to them. This is known as catharsis. In Shakespearean tragedies the protagonist always has a
Othello - Iago
Othello - Iago
Othello - Iago Unequivocally, Iago plays an important and major function in the tragedy of Othello. By the end of the play, Iago has been directly responsible for the deaths of Roderigo, Emilia and the protagonist and his love. Iago's importance to the play is revealed by his contribution to the plot and his significance relative to other characters. Iago's function, which invariably adds to the importance he has on the play, is to lead to the downfall of Othello therefore revealing the themes o
Othello
Othello
Othello William Shakespeare`s Othello is a play set in Venice. The plot is based on a story about two people who love each other dearly and the problems and conflicts they face from the start. The conflicts are, for the most part, tied in with racial issues and questions of loyalty. These conflicts stem from the society around the couple, as well as from the couple themselves as they too are part of this society, but with very different backgrounds: The female protagonist is the daughter of a hi
Hamlets Insanity
Hamlets Insanity
Hamlet's Insanity The Darkness of Insanity Insanity is an ever growing black hole which envelopes the pitiful mind of the its victim. The mental condition of Hamlet has been well debated throughout the years even though in Shakespeare?s tragedy Hamlet does admit that his madness is an elaborate scheme. Many see this fact as a way to discredit the idea of Hamlet?s insanity but one should also take into consideration the amount of proven psychopaths who constantly admit to their sanity. Through hi
Othello - A Tragedy Without Meaning?
Othello - A Tragedy Without Meaning?
Othello - A Tragedy Without Meaning? A tragedy without meaning ?Othello? is not, as the very genre of tragedy seeks to imitate action and life, both of which have an inherit meaning. In some ways, Shakespeare?s work can be considered didactic as in the case in classical tragedy, the hero?s falls arises as fault of a hamartia on his part, a fault which plagues humanity. In fact, throughout the work, Othello is revealed to have many more faults and weaknesses than a man of his stature should posse
The Handmaids Tale
The Handmaids Tale
The Handmaids Tale In 1969 Margaret Atwood first addressed the world with her pro-feminist ideas. As a direct result from encouragement and influence from literary mentors like Atwood, feminism became the rage. As the interest in women's rights heightened, so did the tolerance and need for more strongly biased and feminist sided articles of literature. In 1985, Margaret Atwood completed The Handmaid's Tale, and fueled the fight for equal rights, no glass ceilings, and occupational opportunities
Lord Of The Flies
Lord Of The Flies
Lord of the Flies Lord of the Flies By: William Golding This was the most interesting book I have ever read. It is sort of a cross between Alive and Hatchet. Because the book is extremely addictive and written so superbly, it did not take long for me to get into and finish it. The characters were probably the most interesting element in Lord of the Flies. All British and male, the young boys in this story portray the savagery and sadistic nature to which all but a few succumb. The other boys are
Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes Nature and the Human Soul: The Shackles of Freedom Langston Hughes and Kate Chopin use nature in several dimensions to demonstrate the powerful struggles and burdens of human life. Throughout Kate Chopin^s The Awakening and several of Langston Hughes^ poems, the sweeping imagery of the beauty and power of nature demonstrates the struggles the characters confront, and their eventual freedom from those struggles. Nature and freedom coexist, and the characters eventually learn to fi
J.D. Salinger
J.D. Salinger
J.D. Salinger Many critics consider J.D. Salinger a very controversial writer, for the subject matters that he writes.. J.D. Salinger?s works were generally written during two time periods. The first time period was during World War II, and the second time period was during the 1960?s. Critics feel that the works during the 1960 time period were very inappropriate, because of the problems for which he wrote. The main characters were generally misfits of society. In most of his works, he has the
Invisible Man - Themes
Invisible Man - Themes
Invisible Man - Themes The Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison is a novel which embodies the universal theme of self-discovery, of the search to figure out who one truly is in life which we all are embarked upon. Throughout the text, the narrator is constantly wondering about who he really is, and evaluating the different identities which he assumes for himself. He progresses from being a hopeful student with a bright future to being just another poor black laborer in New Your City to being a fairly
A Dolls House
A Dolls House
A Doll's House Interpretation of A Doll's House A Doll's House is classified under the second phase of Henrik Ibsen's career. It was during this period which he made the transition from mythical and historical dramas to plays dealing with social problems. It was the first in a series investigating the tensions of family life. Written during the Victorian era, the controversial play featuring a female protagonist seeking individuality stirred up more controversy than any of his other works. I
Huckleberry Finn
Huckleberry Finn
Huckleberry Finn The narrator (later identified as Huckleberry Finn) begins Chapter One by stating that the reader may know of him from another book, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mr. Mark Twain, but it ain't t no matter if you have not. According to Huck, Twain mostly told the truth, with some stretchers thrown in, though everyone--except Tom's Aunt Polly, the widow, and maybe Mary--lies once in a while. The other book ended with Tom and Huckleberry finding the gold some robbers had hid
Hills Like White Elephants
Hills Like White Elephants
Hills Like White Elephants Oh, cut it out! (Hemingway 171). Could this be the true feeling of the American toward his unborn child? In the short story Hills Like White Elephants written by Ernest Hemingway, the two main characters find them selves in a moral dilemma in Catholic Spain. Jig, the protagonist, is pregnant by her lover the American. The American, who is not named by the author, wants Jig to have an abortion but she is not convinced. Both are seated at a train station between Barc
Herman Melville
Herman Melville
Herman Melville Melville, Herman (1819-91), an American Novelist, is widely regarded as one of America's greatest and most influential novelists; known primarily as the author of Moby Dick. He belonged to a group of eminent pre-Civil War writers-American Romantics or members of the American Renaissance-who created a new and vigorous national literature. He is one of the notable examples of an American author whose work went largely unrecognized in his own time and died in obscurity. American nov
Hedda Gabler
Hedda Gabler
Hedda Gabler HEDDA GABLER - LONG ESSAY Henrik Ibsen portrays a microcosm of nineteenth century Norwegian society in his play Hedda Gabler. Hedda, the protagonist, exhibits a mixture of masculine and feminine traits due to her unique upbringing under General Gabler and the social mores imposed upon her. However, although this society venerates General Gabler because of his military status, his daughter Hedda is not tolerated due to her non-conformity to the accepted gender stereotypes. Hedda's ge
For Whom The Bell Tolls
For Whom The Bell Tolls
For Whom the Bell Tolls The Disillusionment of Hemingway with War Hemingway uses certain repetitive themes and ideas in his book, For Whom the Bell Tolls, which relate to the grander dogma that he is trying to teach. By using these reoccurring ideas, he is able to make clear his views on certain issues and make the reader understand his thoughts. The most notable of this reoccurring theme is that of war. Hemingway uses the war concept as paradoxical irony in this book, to tell the reader what th
Dubliners
Dubliners
Dubliners Dubliners (1914) by James Joyce Introduction Joyce said that in Dubliners his intention was to write a chapter in the moral history of my country and I chose Dublin for the scene because the city seemed to me the centre of paralysis.The 15 stories which make up the collection are studies on the decay and banality of lower middle-class urban life and the paralysis to which Joyce refers is both intellectual and moral.The characters who appear in the stories lead uneventual and frustr
Down Goes Hurston
Down Goes Hurston
Down Goes Hurston Down Goes Hurston The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920?s is a great time for black artists; it is a rebirth of art, music, books and poetry. In Zora Neale Hurston?s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God Janie, the protagonist, is treated kindly for a black women. She does not go through the torment of black culture during that era or the previous eras. Throughout the book Hurston fibs about racial oppression. Janie gets respect by the white people she encounters. Hurston makes the r
True West
True West
True West In the play True West, by Sam Shepard, the conflict which occurs between Austin and Lee is most interesting when in regard to business. As stated in the assignment sheet the essence of dramatic action is conflict, I find the most enthralling action sequences in this play to be those spurred by a conflict based on business matters. In the beginning of True West the apparent differences between the two main characters, brothers Austin and Lee, are their degrees of success and professiona
The Color Purple - Compared To Macbeth
The Color Purple - Compared To Macbeth
The Color Purple - Compared to Macbeth What is a perfect human? Human perfection may be measured by physical ability or intellectual achievement; however, it may also be measured by strength of character, and in this realm humans may often fall short. Weakness of character, shown through various character flaws, causes most of the hardships in life. Literature such as Shakespeare's Macbeth and Alison Walker's The Color Purple contain three levels of characters: setting characters, secondary char
Catcher In The Rye
Catcher In The Rye
Catcher in the Rye Innocence, Compassion, and some ?Crazy? Cliff A novel, which has gained literary recognition worldwide, scrutiny to the point of censorship and has established a following among adolescents, The Catcher in the Rye is in its entirety a unique connotation of the preservation of innocence and the pursuit of compassion. With certain elegance the writer J.D. Salinger, substantiates the growth and perils, which lie between childhood and adulthood. Embellishing the differentiation be
Catcher In The Rye
Catcher In The Rye
Catcher in the Rye Holden Caulfied: Saint, Snob, or Somewhere In-between? Although J.D. Salinger has only one novel to his credit, that novel, The Catcher in the Rye, is recognized as an exceptional literary work. The key to the success of The Catcher in the Rye is the main character, Holden Caulfield. There are many different critics that view Holden in many different ways. Some believe Holden to be a conceited snob, while others see Holden as a Christ-like figure. It is my opinion, however, th
Catch 22 - Satire
Catch 22 - Satire
Catch 22 - Satire Catch 22 Joseph Heller satirizes, among other matters, red tape and bureaucracy in his first novel, Catch-22. The novel concerns itself with a World War II bombardier named Yossarian who suddenly realizes the danger of his position and tries various means to extricate himself from further missions. Yossarian is driven crazy by the Germans, who keep shooting at him when he drops bombs on them, and by his American superiors, who seem less concerned about winning the war than they
Catcher In The Rye
Catcher In The Rye
Catcher in the Rye Holden Caulfied: Saint, Snob, or Somewhere In-between? Although J.D. Salinger has only one novel to his credit, that novel, The Catcher in the Rye, is recognized as an exceptional literary work. The key to the success of The Catcher in the Rye is the main character, Holden Caulfield. There are many different critics that view Holden in many different ways. Some believe Holden to be a conceited snob, while others see Holden as a Christ-like figure. It is my opinion, however, th
For Whom The Bell Tolls
For Whom The Bell Tolls
For Whom the Bell Tolls Part II The title For Whom the Bell Tolls symbolizes the uncertainty of life and destiny, where the main character in this story finds himself in a series of unpredictable situations that are beyond his control. The only certain event in life is death and knowing that this may happen to anyone at any time, renders the protagonist powerless against destiny, which he approaches with a fatalistic disposition. Part III For Whom the Bell Tolls takes place in Spain, during the
Black Boy
Black Boy
Black Boy Growing up as a Negro in the South in the early 1900?s is not that easy, for some people tend to suffer different forms of oppression. In this case, it happens in the autobiography called Black Boy written by Richard Wright. The novel is set in the early part of the 1900?s, somewhere in deep Jim Crow South. Richard Wright, who is obviously the main character, is also the protagonist. The antagonist is no one person in particular, for it takes many different forms called oppression in
Beowulfs Universal Appeal
Beowulfs Universal Appeal
Beowulf's Universal Appeal There are archetypal patterns in life. They reoccur and become familiar to people through all ages and ethnicities. Throughout history, few literary works have captivated audiences by incorporating these patterns. The epic Beowulf is one literary work that effectively incorporates timeless components. The epic poem relates the tale of Beowulf, a warrior who throughout his life overcomes evils. It has strong elements of Anglo-Saxon elements of bravery, strength and of r
Antigone Tragic Hero
Antigone Tragic Hero
Antigone Tragic Hero The debate over who is the tragic hero in Antigone continues on to this day. The belief that Antigone is the hero is a strong one. There are many critics who believe, however, that Creon, the Ruler of Thebes, is the true protagonist. Many have argued with no conclusion of who the real tragic hero of the play is. Sophocles might?ve done this purposely in the play to keep the audience on their toes. I have made my own judgments also, based on what I have researched of this wor
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Antigone - Kreon as a Tragic Hero Kreon as a Tragic Hero In Antigone, both Antigone and Kreon could be considered the tragic hero of the play. A tragic hero, defined by A Dictionary of Literary, Dramatic and Cinematic Terms, is someone who suffers due to a tragic flaw, or hamartia. This Greek word is variously translated as tragic flaw or error or weakness . Kreon?s hamartia, like in many plays, is hybris ? Greek for overweening pride, arrogance, or excessive confidence. Kreon?s hybris
Animal Dreams
Animal Dreams
Animal Dreams Animal Dreams The Discovery of Life Through Death In Barbara Kingsolver's novel Animal Dreams, the protagonist, Codi Noline, is unable to become self aware until the death of her sister, Hallie. Throughout the novel Codi's dependency on her sister the apparent cause. When Hallie ventures to Nicaragua to show the farmers how to replenish the land Codi returns to the small town of Grace, Arizona to aid her ailing father, Doc Homero. Hallie's departure in combination with Doc Homero's
A Worn Path
A Worn Path
A Worn Path The Journey of Life As I began to read this short story about a painful and tedious trek an aged grandmother endures she has made for the last three or four years to the city with one intention in mind, to get a medicine for her chronically ill grandson. On a cold December day she repeats the same journey again. As we read, it appears to be about a long journey the woman has made throughout the entire story, but by carefully examining the theme, it tells us that there is a greater me
A Prayer For Owen Meany
A Prayer For Owen Meany
A Prayer for Owen Meany A Prayer For Owen Meany It is often the case in the novels with strong themes, that the author must rely on certain prearranged molds when shaping the major characters and their relationships with each other. These molded characters allow for the thematic content of the novel to be expressed more clearly. Hence, the thoughts and actions of the characters give a better idea to develop themes in the novel. A Separate Peace by John Knowles and A Prayer for Owen Meany by John
A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man Religion As Repression
A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man Religion As Repression
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Religion as Repression A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: Religion as Repression Like his protagonist, James Joyce was an Irish Catholic. He was also sent to Clongowes Wood College to board and study as a young boy. In effect the story is in part an autobiography of Joyce's own life up to the age of twenty or so (Kershner 6). In his essay A Portrait as Rebellion Norman Holland states: Because of Portrait's peculiar combination of novel and autobiogra
A New England Nun
A New England Nun
A New England Nun In A New England Nun , Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife. This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets? lives, her dog Caesar?s and that of her little yellow ca
A Jury Of Her Peers
A Jury Of Her Peers
A Jury of Her Peers Susan Glaspell?s A Jury of Her Peers is an ethic drama that presents us with a mirror image of a society where men are considered superior to women in all actions. This drama take are reader, not on a murder mystery, but rather a strong human compassion of help for those in need. Author of this drama supports Minnie Foster?s act of killing her husband, John Wright as a sign of standing up for herself. Even though killing someone in revenge of a dead bird seems to be meaningle
The Old Man And The Sea - A Journey To Enlightenment
The Old Man And The Sea - A Journey To Enlightenment
The Old Man and the Sea - A Journey to Enlightenment Through time, as distant as the early periods when Homo habilis first roamed the earth, man has incessantly entered into conflict with nature. As the primitive man has evolved, he has become over-dependant on nature to the point where he takes advantage of its abundance of gifts. Despite the fact that man has a tendency to desecrate nature, there are those who recognize and praise its power and make an effort to become one with it. Though it m
The Sun Also Rises
The Sun Also Rises
The Sun Also Rises A Hard Day's Knight: Searching for a Hero in The Sun Also Rises Unlike many of the books published before the 1920s, in Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises there is a distinct lack of the stereotypical nineteenth-century hero figure. In looking for such a hero, the reader expects one character to stand out as the champion of a moral truth or of a standard above mere human existence. Though all of the main characters exhibit the characteristics of a classic noble protagonist at one
A Good Man Is Hard To Find
A Good Man Is Hard To Find
A Good Man Is Hard to Find A Good Man is Hard to Find In the short story, A Good Man is Hard to Find , the main character is the grandmother. Flannery O?Connor, the author, lets the reader find out who the grandmother is by her conversations and reactions to the other characters in the story. The grandmother is the most important character in the story because she has a main role in the stories principal action. This little old lady is the protagonist in this piece. We learn more about her from
Frankenstein
Frankenstein
Frankenstein Book Report: Rights and Responsibilities-Frankenstein February 15, 1998 When you think of science you think of hypotheses and conclusions, applications and benefits, which are all for the good of humankind of course. And with each new discovery, the human race takes one step further away from all other species and one step closer to perfection because that is the quest. Right? The point is to take every proven law and unprove it or add on. Scientists invent and test for the sole
A Clockwork Orange
A Clockwork Orange
A Clockwork Orange The new American edition of the novel A Clockwork Orange features a final chapter that was omitted from the original American edition against the author's preference. Anthony Burgess, the novel's author, provided for the new edition an introduction to explain not only the significance of the twenty-first chapter but also the purpose of the entire book, which was the fundamental importance of moral choice. Burgess states that the twenty-first chapter was intended to show the ma