Raft Of The Medusa

Romanticism And Realism
Romanticism And Realism
Romanticism and Realism At the end of the Baroque Period in the eighteenth and nineteenth century art was divided into two distinct categories, Romanticism and Realism. Romanticism, the passion-filled works illustrating stimulating accounts of specific events with symbolic gestures emerging from the scene, separated itself from the more politically correct stance taken by Realists. A fine example of Romanticism is G?ricault?s Raft of the Medusa. The brutal scene, set afloat on the wild seas, is
How The Visual Arts Communicate
How The Visual Arts Communicate
How The Visual Arts Communicate Jennifer Linnell ARTS 100 November 30, 2015 Shay Tyler How The Visual Arts Communicate The Raft of the Medusa, painted by Theodore Gericault is a 23-foot-long by 16-foot-high oil on canvasĀ and portrays the terrible conditions on a raft that was occupied by stranded passengers of the ship Medusa. The painting has been best described as gloomy because the colors fluctuate between dark and light but still maintain an overcast. Gericault uses his art to make a power