Shallowness

Capital Punishment
Capital Punishment
Capital Punishment By: Omer Kassam Thesis One: In principle a case can be made on moral grounds both supporting and opposing capital punishment. Thesis two: Concretely and in practice, compelling arguments against capital punishment can be made on the basis of its actual administration in our society. Two different cases can be made. One is based on justice and the nature of a moral community. This leads to a defense of capital punishment. The second is based on love and the nature of an ideal s
Capital Punishment: For And Against
Capital Punishment: For And Against
Capital Punishment: For and Against Thesis One: In principle a case can be made on moral grounds both supporting and opposing capital punishment. Thesis two: Concretely and in practice, compelling arguments against capital punishment can be made on the basis of its actual administration in our society. Two different cases can be made. One is based on justice and the nature of a moral community. This leads to a defense of capital punishment. The second is based on love and the nature of an ideal
Pride And Prejudice
Pride And Prejudice
Pride And Prejudice Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, set in Nineteenth century England, is a novel about marriage. Austen's feminine writing and weaved storyline creates a novel which can be interesting to read and which women especially enjoy. The novel has a strong theme of marriage as a mother (Mrs. Bennet) desperately trying to marry her daughters off. She didn't care about the quality of the men her daughters were marrying, but was satisfied just as long as they found
The Invisible Man
The Invisible Man
The Invisible Man Ralph Ellison?s Invisible Man depicts a realistic society where white people act as if black people are less than human. Ellison uses papers and letters to show the narrator?s poor position in this society. Many papers seem to show good fortune for the narrator, but only provide false dreams. The narrator?s prize of a brief case containing his scholarship first illustrates this falsehood: take this prize and keep it well. Consider it a badge of office. Prize it. Keep developing
Dantes Canto XXVIII
Dantes Canto XXVIII
Dante's Canto XXVIII Dante begins the opening of Canto XXVIII with a rhetorical question. Virgil and he have just arrived in the Ninth Abyss of the Eighth Circle of hell. In this pouch the Sowers of Discord and Schism are continually wounded by a demon with a sword. Dante poses a question to the reader: Who, even with untrammeled words and many attempts at telling, ever could recount in full the blood and wounds that I now saw? (Lines 1-3) The rhetorical question draws the reader into the passa
dubliners
dubliners
A TEACHER?S GUIDE TO THE SIGNET CLASSIC EDITION OF JAMES JOYCE?S DUBLINERS By JAMES R. COPE and WENDY PATRICK COPE S E R I E S E D I T O R S : W. GEIGER ELLIS, ED.D., ARTHEA J. S. REED, PH.D., UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, EMERITUS and UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, RETIRED A Teacher?s Guide to the Signet Classic Edition of James Joyce?s Dubliners 2 INTRODUCTION Dubliners by James Joyce is a good reading choice for advanced level 12th-grade students. As his first published work of fiction, Dubliners sta