Writ Of Certiorari

United States V. Nixon, President Of The United States
United States V. Nixon, President Of The United States
United States v. Nixon, President of the United States Throughout American history, the fear that our leaders may sometimes think themselves above the law has always been evident. The fear is that power brings corruptness. To prevent this, however, the system of checks and balances has been installed into the Constitution. No one branch of government stands above the law in this setup. This point was reasserted in the the Supreme Court case of 1974, United States v. Nixon. This case involved the
Olmstead V. United States (1928)
Olmstead V. United States (1928)
Olmstead v. United States (1928) Opinion delivered by Chief Justice Taft Vote: 5-4 Case reached Supreme Court by writ of certiorari. Facts: The evidence in the records discloses a conspiracy of amazing magnitude to import, possess, and sell liquor unlawfully. Involved were not less than fifty employees, two sea-going vessels for transportation of the goods to British Columbia, a ranch beyond the city limits of Seattle with a large underground cache to store the liquor, and many other caches arou
Mitchell V. Wisconsin: Why Mitchell V. Wisconsin Sucked
Mitchell V. Wisconsin: Why Mitchell V. Wisconsin Sucked
Mitchell v. Wisconsin: Why Mitchell v. Wisconsin Sucked On June 11, 1993, the United State Supreme Court upheld Wisconsin's penalty enhancement law, which imposes harsher sentences on criminals who intentionally select the person against whom the crime...is committed..because of the race, religion, color, disability, sexual orientation, national origin or ancestry of that person. Chief Justice Rehnquist deliverd the opinion of the unanimous Court. This paper argues against the decision, and wi